Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Having two points or cusps, as the crescent moon.
  • n. A bicuspid tooth, especially a premolar.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Having two points.
  • n. A tooth with two cusps; a premolar tooth. syn.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Having two points or prominences; ending in two points; -- said of teeth, leaves, fruit, etc.
  • n. One of the two double-pointed teeth which intervene between the canines (cuspids) and the molars, on each side of each jaw. See tooth, n.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Having two points, fangs, or cusps.
  • Specifically applied — In geometry, to a curve having two cusps, In human anatomy, to the premolar teeth or false molars, of which there are two on each side above and below, replacing the milk-molars; to the mitral valve guarding the left auriculoventricular orifice of the heart, the corresponding right orifice being guarded by the tricuspid valve, In entomology, to a claw or mandible having two pointed processes or teeth. Also bicuspidal, bicuspidate.
  • n. One of the premolars or false molars in man, of which there are in the adult two on each side, above and below, between the canines and the true molars. They are the teeth which succeed and replace the milk-molars of the child. Also bicuspis.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. having two cusps or points (especially a molar tooth)
  • n. a tooth having two cusps or points; located between the incisors and the molars

Etymologies

New Latin bicuspis, bicuspid- : Latin bi-, two; see bi-1 + Latin cuspis, sharp point.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

Comments

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  • "Bill of lading not endorsed", in the abbreviated jargon of railway telegraphers. --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 20, 2013

  • The fox had a rotten bicuspid and unusually bad breath.

    - William Steig, Doctor De Soto

    October 27, 2008