Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. An enema.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A medicine applied via the rectum; an enema or suppository

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A liquid injected into the lower intestines by means of a syringe; an injection; an enema.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To administer a rectal injection: same as clysterize.
  • n. An enema; an injection.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. an injection of a liquid through the anus to stimulate evacuation; sometimes used for diagnostic purposes

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Middle English clister, from Old French clistere, from Latin clyster, from Greek klustēr, clyster pipe, from kluzein, to wash out.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle French clystere, or its source, Latin clyster, from Ancient Greek κλυστήρ.

Examples

  • Curious to say the clyster is almost unknown to the people of Hindostan although the barbarous West Africans use it daily to “wash ‘um belly,” as the Bonney-men say.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Put a pair of bellows end into a clyster pipe, and applying it into the fundament, open the bowels, so draw forth the wind, natura non admittit vacuum.

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • For without question, a clyster opportunely used, cannot choose in this, as most other maladies, but to do very much good; Clysteres nutriunt, sometimes clysters nourish, as they may be prepared, as I was informed not long since by a learned lecture of our natural philosophy [4278] reader, which he handled by way of discourse, out of some other noted physicians.

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • Walter Bruel would have a practitioner begin first with a clyster of his, which he prescribes before bloodletting: the common sort, as Mercurialis, Montaltus cap.

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • On the second day all the symptoms were exacerbated; late in the evening had a proper stool from a small clyster; the night quiet.

    Of The Epidemics

  • On the sixth, in the morning, in a quiet state; in the evening the pains greater; had a paroxysm; in the evening the bowels properly opened by a small clyster; slept at night.

    Of The Epidemics

  • On the sixteenth, looseness of the bowels from a stimulant clyster; afterwards she passed her drink, nor could retain anything, for she was completely insensible; skin parched and tense.

    Of The Epidemics

  • But if the bowels appear to be constipated, administer a soothing clyster.

    On Regimen In Acute Diseases

  • To a person in such a state give to drink water and as much boiled hydromel of a watery consistence as he will take; and if the mouth be bitter, it may be advantageous to administer an emetic and clyster; and if these things do not loosen the bowels, purge with the boiled milk of asses.

    On Regimen In Acute Diseases

  • When the flatus is offensive, either a suppository or clyster is to be administered; but otherwise the oxymel is to be discontinued, until the matters descend to the lower part of the bowels, and then they are to be evacuated by a clyster.

    On Regimen In Acute Diseases

Comments

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  • See tappen.

    March 1, 2011

  • Encountered this while reading The Fiery Cross by Diana Gabaldon.

    September 10, 2009

  • Encountered this word in Dan Simmons' novel Drood

    June 27, 2009

  • Bilbies!

    (*confused*)

    September 11, 2008

  • Bears!

    September 11, 2008

  • *guffaw*

    September 11, 2008

  • 0_o

    September 11, 2008

  • I love definition 3 best of all.

    July 10, 2008

  • 1. A medicine injected into the rectum, to empty or cleanse the bowels, to afford nutrition, etc.; an injection, enema; sometimes, a suppository; an old term for enema.

    2. The pipe or syringe used in injection; a clyster-pipe.

    3. A contemptuous name for a medical practitioner.

    July 10, 2008