Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A counterbalancing weight.
  • n. A force or influence that balances or equally counteracts another.
  • n. The state of being in equilibrium.
  • transitive v. To oppose with an equal weight; counterbalance.
  • transitive v. To act against with an equal force or power; offset.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A weight sufficient to balance another, as in the opposite scale of a balance; an equal weight.
  • n. An equal power or force acting in opposition; a force sufficient to balance another force.
  • n. The relation of two weights or forces which balance each other; equilibrium; equiponderance.
  • v. To act against with equal weight; to equal in weight; to balance the weight of; to counterbalance.
  • v. To act against with equal power; to balance.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To act against with equal weight; to equal in weight; to balance the weight of; to counterbalance.
  • transitive v. To act against with equal power; to balance.
  • n. A weight sufficient to balance another, as in the opposite scale of a balance; an equal weight.
  • n. An equal power or force acting in opposition; a force sufficient to balance another force.
  • n. The relation of two weights or forces which balance each other; equilibrium; equiponderance.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A weight equal to and balancing or counteracting another weight; specifically, a body or mass of the same weight with another opposed to it, as in the opposite scale of a balance.
  • n. Hence Any equal power or force acting in opposition; a force sufficient to balance another force.
  • n. The state of being in equilibrium with another weight or force.
  • n. In the manège, a position of the rider in which his body is duly balanced in his seat, not inclined more to one side than the other; equilibrium.
  • To act in opposition to, or counteract, as a counterpoise; counterbalance; be equiponderant to; equal in weight.
  • Hence To act against in any manner with equal power or effect; balance; restore the balance to.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a weight that balances another weight
  • v. constitute a counterweight or counterbalance to

Etymologies

Alteration (influenced by poise1) of Middle English countrepeis, from Old French contrepeis : contre-, counter- + peis, weight; see avoirdupois.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Old French contrepois, contrepeser, later assimilated to poise. (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

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  • JM is constantly balancing counterpoise and counterpole and that's what counts.

    July 8, 2010

  • "Our spoils we have brought home
    Do more than counterpoise a full third part
    The charges of the action."
    - William Shakespeare, 'The Tragedy of Coriolanus'.

    August 29, 2009