Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To mend (a garment, for example) by weaving thread or yarn across a gap or hole.
  • intransitive v. To repair a hole, as in a garment, by weaving thread or yarn across it.
  • n. A hole repaired by weaving thread or yarn across it: a sock full of darns.
  • interj. Used to express dissatisfaction or annoyance.
  • adv. Damn.
  • transitive v. To damn.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Damn.
  • adv. Damned.
  • interj. Damn.
  • v. Euphemism of damn.
  • v. To repair by stitching with thread or yarn, particularly by using a needle to construct a weave across a damaged area of fabric.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To mend as a rent or hole, with interlacing stitches of yarn or thread by means of a needle; to sew together with yarn or thread.
  • n. A place mended by darning.
  • transitive v. A colloquial euphemism for damn.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To mend by filling in a rent or hole with yarn or thread (usually like that of the fabric) by means of a needle; repair by interweaving with yarn or thread.
  • n. A darned patch.
  • To damn (when used as a colloquial oath): commonly used as an exclamation.
  • Same as dern.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. repair by sewing
  • n. something of little value
  • n. sewing that repairs a worn or torn hole (especially in a garment)

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

French dialectal darner, perhaps from Norman French darne, piece, from Breton darn.
Alteration of damn.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Alteration of damn

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English dernen ("to keep secret, hide, conceal (a hole)"), from Old English diernan ("to hide, conceal"), from dierne ("secret"), from Proto-Germanic *darnijaz (“secret”). More at dern.

Examples

  • Otherwise it reads as an aggressive attack without just cause. on January 5, 2008 at 12: 41 am | Reply notellin darn IG got in first, should not have typed so much on January 5, 2008 at 1: 18 am | Reply Southern town cop

    Final Fantasy « POLICE INSPECTOR BLOG

  • Maybe I'm being near-sighted here, but I can't name a darn mystery author, one who solely writes mysteries, who'd pull in those numbers to a live gig.

    Fame

  • I'd worked with her before on Alias and she's always happy and always pleasant to everyone really and when she swears she says thing like 'darnit' and 'darn' - now even The Waltons go a bit (further).

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  • Keep this compulsory redistribution of wealth up from those who make it to those who'd like it, and they orta just call the darn things

    Neptunus Lex

  • Come on now, "gotcha" and "darn" - these are the words we want to hear from a VP?

    WordPress.com News

  • _'a la Labrador_ (alias darn goods), followed by black coffee.

    The Long Labrador Trail

  • I can tell you growing up my Grama didn't have a problem with us kids saying "darn" but she hit the roof if you said "damn" or "shut up" for that matter.

    Does "Frick" = "Fuck"?

  • ` ` We sort of got frustrated a little bit and said 'darn' and got two techs, '' Paul said.

    USATODAY.com

  • And not all players actually say "darn" or "gosh" when they strike out with the bases loaded.

    No. 3: Stars easy to see on field, in stands at Dodger Stadium

  • I have never heard a VP or Presidential nominee use the words "darn" or "heck" in a debate.

    Biden Vs. "Mooseburger Madame"- A Compilation of eMails about Debate

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