Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To make repairs or restoration to; fix.
  • transitive v. To reform or correct: mend one's ways.
  • intransitive v. To improve in health or condition: The patient is mending well.
  • intransitive v. To heal: The bone mended in a month.
  • intransitive v. To make repairs or corrections.
  • n. The act of mending: did a neat mend on the sock.
  • n. A mended place: You can't tell where the mend is.
  • idiom mend fences To improve poor relations, especially in politics: "Whatever thoughts he may have entertained about mending some fences with [them] were banished” ( Conor Cruise O'Brien).
  • idiom on the mend Improving, especially in health.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A place, as in clothing, which has been repaired by mending.
  • n. The act of repairing.
  • v. To repair, as anything that is torn, broken, defaced, decayed, or the like; to restore from partial decay, injury, or defacement; to patch up; to put in shape or order again; to re-create; as, to mend a garment or a machine.
  • v. To alter for the better; to set right; to reform; hence, to quicken; as, to mend one's manners or pace.
  • v. To help, to advance, to further; to add to.
  • v. To grow better; to advance to a better state; to become improved.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To repair, as anything that is torn, broken, defaced, decayed, or the like; to restore from partial decay, injury, or defacement; to patch up; to put in shape or order again; to re-create.
  • transitive v. To alter for the better; to set right; to reform; hence, to quicken.
  • transitive v. To help, to advance, to further; to add to.
  • intransitive v. To grow better; to advance to a better state; to become improved; to recover; to heal.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To repair, as something broken, defaced, deranged, or worn; make whole or fit for use; restore to a sound or serviceable condition: as, to mend shoes or clothes, a wall or a road.
  • To correct or reform; make or set right; bring to a proper state or condition: as, to mend one's ways, health, or fortune; that will not mend the matter.
  • To improve; make better in any way; help, further, better, advance in value or consideration, etc.
  • To improve upon; add to; surpass or outdo: as, to mend one's shot (that is, to make a better one).
  • To grow or do better; improve; act or behave better.
  • n. Amendment; improvement; course of improvement; way to recoversy: as, to be on the mend (said especially of a person recovering from illness).

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. restore by replacing a part or putting together what is torn or broken
  • n. the act of putting something in working order again
  • n. sewing that repairs a worn or torn hole (especially in a garment)
  • v. heal or recover

Etymologies

Middle English menden, short for amenden, to amend; see amend.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English menden, by apheresis for amenden ("to amend"); see amend. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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