Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Behaving disobediently or mischievously: a naughty child.
  • adj. Indecent; improper: a naughty wink.
  • adj. Archaic Wicked; immoral.
  • n. One that is naughty.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Having little or nothing.
  • adj. Worthless; bad; good for nothing.
  • adj. hence, corrupt; wicked.
  • adj. Mischievous; perverse; froward; guilty of disobedient or improper conduct.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Having nothing; poor.
  • Worthless; good-for-nothing; bad.
  • Disagreeable.
  • Morally bad; wicked; corrupt.
  • In a mitigated sense, bad in conduct or speech; improper; mischievous: used with reference to the more or less venial faults or delinquencies of children, or playfully to those of older persons: as, a naughty child; naughty conduct; oh, you naughty man!

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. suggestive of sexual impropriety
  • adj. badly behaved

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Middle English noughti, wicked, from nought, nothing, evil, from Old English nāwiht, nothing; see naught.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From naught +‎ -y.

Examples

  • Other items inside were a set of furry handcuffs, bondage ropes with a sign reading "tied up at the moment", an eye mask with the label "naughty but nice", Viagra tablets and vibrators.

    The Independent - Frontpage RSS Feed

  • And the easiest way to be naughty is to make some bigoted remark.

    Somebody Kill Me Now

  • Engaged in naughty writerly gossip, but did not succumb to peer pressure and accompany jaylake and karindira to the bar, staying behind to keep butt in chair and hands on keyboard.

    2/27/07: Lo, I am mighty

  • My naughty is a very visible minority of Missouri's citizens who routinely trash our streets and highways.

    Fly Rod Giveaway!

  • Even the quintessential Good Book abounds in naughty passages like the men in II Kings 18: 27 who, as the comparatively tame King James translation puts it, “eat their own dung, and drink their own piss.”

    EXTRALIFE – By Scott Johnson - Almost Before We Spoke, We Swore

  • And it says in a book I was reading only yesterday that not being naughty is not enough.

    The Wouldbegoods

  • "It's nothing naughty, is it," Daisy asked, "like the last time you had that was rousingly good?"

    The Wouldbegoods

  • It was only the rather comic grotesqueness seen sometimes in the face of a little child when he is what his mother calls a naughty boy, and distends his mouth and closes his eyes for a genuine howl.

    Bunyip Land A Story of Adventure in New Guinea

  • But the word naughty provoked such a fit of crying that there was nothing for it but for Mrs Carbonel to pick the child up and struggle on as best she could, soothing her terror at the narrow paths and the unknown way, and the mysterious alarm of the woodlands, as well, perhaps, as the undefined sense of other people's dread and agitation.

    The Carbonels

  • There was also a conspicuous absence of stimulus targets as President O desperately wanted to position for but decided to back off of, no banking reforms for the greedy and naughty bankers (I absolutely love the word naughty!) who caused the debacle in the first place nor were there any actions to stem that from occurring again in the future.

    Fast Company

Comments

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  • Ah! Here I am.

    December 21, 2009

  • Last night I read a verse in my King James bible which, had I not already been a lover of the Book, would have converted me then and there:

    "Wherefore lay apart all filthiness and superfluity of naughtiness, and receive with meekness the engrafted word, which is able to save your souls."

    Beautiful, just beautiful.

    September 17, 2009

  • naughty meanings has gone from 'bad' to 'mischief'

    September 8, 2009

  • Why would you do that to a kid?

    Now, a pet bird....

    *pondering*

    June 10, 2009

  • Oh! Yes, of course.

    *now pondering "Xerxes"*

    I almost named my dog Xerxes when I was a kid. Maybe I should consider naming my kid Xerxes now that I'm a bear.

    June 10, 2009

  • Right, C_B, but not to be confused with "Atta Xerxes!", which is how the Old Persians praised their kids and dogs when they did something clever.

    June 10, 2009

  • Artaxerxes...

    Artaxerxes... *ponders*

    June 10, 2009

  • Interesting citation, Yarb. Gibbon must be using the word in the sense of "disobedient" or perhaps "unruly", if not in the more archaic sense of "wicked".

    June 10, 2009

  • The successor of Cyrus and Artaxerxes was the only rival whom he deemed worthy of his arms; and he resolved, by the final conquest of Persia, to chastise the naughty nation which had so long resisted and insulted the majesty of Rome.

    - Gibbon, Decline and Fall, XXIV. i.

    June 10, 2009

  • There was a naughty boy,

    A naughty boy was he,

    He would not stop at home,

    He could not quiet be-

    He took

    In his knapsack

    A book

    Full of vowels

    And a shirt

    With some towels,

    A slight cap

    For night cap,

    A hair brush,

    Comb ditto,

    New stockings-

    For old ones

    Would split O!

    This knapsack

    Tight at 'is back

    He rivetted close

    And followed his nose

    To the North,

    To the North,

    And followed his nose

    To the North.

    There was a naughty boy,

    And a naughty boy was he,

    He ran away to Scotland

    The people for to see-

    There he found

    That the ground

    Was as hard,

    That a yard

    Was as long,

    That a song

    Was as merry,

    That a cherry

    Was as red-

    That lead

    Was as weighty

    That fourscore

    Was as eighty,

    That a door

    Was as wooden

    As in England-

    So he stood in his shoes

    And he wondered,

    He wondered,

    He stood in his shoes

    And he wondered.

    (John Keats)

    February 9, 2009

  • When I was a little boy I was often naughty (sighs) now I find it much more difficult.

    December 14, 2007