Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Having or showing keen interest, intense desire, or impatient expectancy. See Usage Note at anxious.
  • adj. Obsolete Tart; sharp; cutting.
  • n. Variant of eagre.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. sharp; sour; acid.
  • adj. sharp; keen; bitter; severe.
  • adj. this sense?) Excited by desire in the pursuit of any object; ardent to pursue, perform, or obtain; keenly desirous; hotly longing; earnest; zealous; impetuous; vehement.
  • adj. brittle; inflexible; not ductile.
  • n. Alternative form of eagre. Tidal bore.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Sharp; sour; acid.
  • adj. Sharp; keen; bitter; severe.
  • adj. Excited by desire in the pursuit of any object; ardent to pursue, perform, or obtain; keenly desirous; hotly longing; earnest; zealous; impetuous; vehement.
  • adj. Brittle; inflexible; not ductile.
  • n. Same as eagre.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Sharp; sour; acid.
  • Sharp; keen; biting; severe; bitter. [Obsolete or archaic.]
  • Sharply inclined or anxious; sharp-set; excited by ardent desire; impatiently longing; vehement; keen: as, the soldiers were eager to engage the enemy; men are eager in the pursuit of wealth; eager spirits; eager zeal.
  • Manifesting sharpness of desire or strength of feeling; marked by great earnestness: as, an eager look or manner; eager words.
  • Brittle.
  • Synonyms Fervent, fervid, warm, glowing, zealous, forward, enthusiastic, impatient, sanguine, animated.
  • To make eager; urge; incite.
  • n. A sudden and formidable influx and surging of the tide in a high wave or waves, up a river or an estuary; a bore, as in the Severn, the Hooghly, and the Bay of Fundy.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. having or showing keen interest or intense desire or impatient expectancy
  • n. a high wave (often dangerous) caused by tidal flow (as by colliding tidal currents or in a narrow estuary)

Etymologies

Middle English eger, sour, sharp, impetuous, from Anglo-Norman egre, from Latin ācer; see ak- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English eger, from Old French egre, from Latin acer ("sharp, keen"); see acid, acerb, etc. Compare vinegar, alegar. (Wiktionary)
See eagre (Wiktionary)

Examples

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