Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Coming into view, existence, or notice: emergent spring shoots; an emergent political leader.
  • adj. Emerging: emergent nations.
  • adj. Rising above a surrounding medium, especially a fluid.
  • adj. Arising or occurring unexpectedly: money laid aside for emergent contingencies.
  • adj. Demanding prompt action; urgent.
  • adj. Occurring as a consequence; resultant: economic problems emergent from the restriction of credit.
  • n. One that is coming into view or existence: "The giant redwoods . . . outstrip the emergents of the rain forest, which rarely reach two hundred feet” ( Catherine Caulfield).

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. emerging; coming into view or into existence; nascent; new.
  • adj. taller than the surrounding vegetation
  • adj. having leaves and flowers above the water
  • adj. Having gameplay that arises from its mechanics, rather than a linear storyline.
  • n. A plant whose root system grows underwater, but whose shoot, leaves and flowers grows up and above the water.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Rising or emerging out of a fluid or anything that covers or conceals; issuing; coming to light.
  • adj. Suddenly appearing; arising unexpectedly; calling for prompt action; urgent.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Rising from or out of anything that covers or surrounds; coming forth or into view; protruding.
  • Specifically— In bryology, rising slightly above the perichætium: applied to the capsule.
  • In lichenology, protruding through the cortical layer.
  • Issuing or proceeding.
  • Coming suddenly; sudden; casual; unexpected; hence, calling for immediate action or remedy; urgent; pressing.
  • n. That which emerges or comes forth; that which appears or comes into view; a natural occurrence.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. occurring unexpectedly and requiring urgent action
  • adj. coming into existence

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • China's position is best illustrated by an influential foreign policy advisor to Chinese leaders who requested an edit to the forum's communiqué: the phrase "emergent nations led by China" was to be changed to "emergent nations including China".

    Nathan Gardels: Eric X. Li's Globalization 2.0

  • Purposely ignoring American Jews, Roman Catholics, mainline Protestants and many evangelicals-about 70 percent of religious Americans-Bloom focuses on the Mormons, the Southern Baptists and other made-in-America sects to tease out what he calls the emergent "American Religion."

    Hark, The Harold Angel

  • What it does not recognize is the third case, which we call emergent strategy where a realized pattern was not expressly intended.

    The Rise and Fall of Strategic Planning

  • These people, which he calls emergent consumers, are characterized by their vision and thinking styles.

    WN.com - Articles related to What does youth do online

  • The other wing comes from young people within the Evangelical communities who are questioning and redefining their tradition and is known as "emergent" Christianity.

    Rev. Roger Wolsey: Christianity For People Who Don't Like Christianity

  • The two beams, in short, emergent from the spar, are polarized, their directions of vibration being at right angles to each other.

    Six Lectures on Light Delivered In The United States In 1872-1873

  • It may turn out that evolution of intelligence involves long-term emergent risks to genetic lines that ultimately kill off intelligence before it gets much beyond where we are at.

    rabble.ca - News for the rest of us

  • If he or she is "emergent" - which usually means young, but can also refer to older artists who have only recently signed up with a well-known gallery-the risk is greater, but so is the potential return.

    The Economist: Correspondent's diary

  • Designing and constructing a free living life form doesn't have to involve any (hopelessly) complicating assumptions (or hypotheses) such as "1) Life originated on the Earth, 2) Life is emergent from a specific set of naturally given abiological conditions, 3) We can identify those conditions on Earth, both coincident and causal, with the origin of life and reproduce those conditions in the laboratory and life will emerge."

    Dawkins on the OOL

  • Here's what I assume are the assumptions (LOL) that make it an entertaining subject matter to argue over: 1) Life originated on the Earth, 2) Life is emergent from a specific set of naturally given abiological conditions, 3) We can identify those conditions on Earth, both coincident and causal, with the origin of life and reproduce those conditions in the laboratory and life will emerge.

    Dawkins on the OOL

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