Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Equality in distribution, as of weight, relationship, or emotional forces; equilibrium.
  • n. A counterpoise; a counterbalance.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A state of balance; equilibrium.
  • n. A counterbalance.
  • v. To act or make to act as an equipoise.
  • v. To cause to be or stay in equipoise.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Equality of weight or force; hence, equilibrium; a state in which the two ends or sides of a thing are balanced, and hence equal; state of being equally balanced; -- said of moral, political, or social interests or forces.
  • n. Counterpoise.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. An equal distribution of weight; equality of weight or force; just balance; a state in which the two ends or sides of a thing are balanced or kept in equilibrium: as, hold the scales in equipoise.
  • n. A balancing weight or force; a counterpoise.
  • To bring into a state of equipoise or balance; hold in equipoise.
  • To counterbalance.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. equality of distribution

Etymologies

From equi- +‎ poise. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • I used to believe in having a good time, and all that sort of nonsense; but I've come to see that what he calls equipoise is the true road to happiness, and that it's best to leave off

    A Romantic Young Lady

  • Clute's concept of "equipoise" is important to those types of stories.

    Strange Fiction 8

  • Partial/Total: Conventionally, fantastique employs partial warp morphing, placing credibility and determinacy warps in equipoise, while mystery fiction employs total warp morphing, recasting all alethic quirks as cryptica.

    Archive 2009-06-01

  • I am not a "follower" or "joiner," but the one thing I received that day was exactly what the word equipoise defines: a state of balance and poise.

    Marjorie Hope Rothstein: What's Your Word Of The Year For 2011?

  • Or would it be more powerful to leave the truth unknown, leave the play in equipoise, an exemplar of Todorov's fantastique?

    Modality and Hamlet

  • "follower" or "joiner," but the one thing I received that day was exactly what the word equipoise defines: a state of balance and poise.

    The Full Feed from HuffingtonPost.com

  • The first time I heard the word "equipoise" was in an all-day Siddha Yoga Intensive with the Siddha Guru, Gurumayi.

    Marjorie Hope Rothstein: What's Your Word Of The Year For 2011?

  • The definition of "equipoise" according to the Merriam Webster Dictionary:

    Marjorie Hope Rothstein: What's Your Word Of The Year For 2011?

  • Perot's imperative, says one adviser, will be to pull votes in equal amounts from both Clinton and Bush-the kind of equipoise an independent needs to win.

    Perot's Patriot Games

  • The weighty authority, however, of Sainte-Beuve, at first thrown into the scale that at length would sink, was thence withdrawn, and at last, if not resolutely cast upon the opposite side of the balance, was left wavering in a kind of equipoise between the one and the other.

    Classic French Course in English

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • “Sometimes people fault Obama for being too cool. I can see their point 5 percent of the time, but 95 percent of the time, it’s good to have a president with equipoise.”

    The New York Times, The Calm, Cool and Collected President, by David Brooks and Gail Collins, May 5, 2010

    May 6, 2010

  • Sounds to me like one of the points a judge would rate in an equestrian event.

    October 26, 2009

  • “A tense equipoise cur­rent­ly pre­vails among the Justices of the Supreme Court, where four hard-​core con­ser­va­tives face off against four moder­ate lib­er­als. An­tho­ny M. Kennedy is the swing vote, de­ter­min­ing the out­come of case after case.”
    — ‘The Choice’, The New Yorker (13 October 2008)

    October 4, 2008