Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A reinforced eyelet, as in cloth or leather, through which a fastener may be passed.
  • n. A small metal or plastic ring used to reinforce such an eyelet.
  • n. Nautical A loop of rope or metal used for securing the edge of a sail to its stay.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A reinforced eyelet, or a small metal or plastic ring used to reinforce an eyelet.
  • n. A young or inexperienced surfer, skateboarder, or snowboarder.
  • n. A circle formed of three-stranded rope.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A ring formed by twisting on itself a single strand of an unlaid rope; also, a metallic eyelet in or for a sail or a mailbag. Sometimes written grummet.
  • n. A ring of rope used as a wad to hold a cannon ball in place.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. See gromet.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. fastener consisting of a metal ring for lining a small hole to permit the attachment of cords or lines

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Probably from obsolete French gromette, gormette, chain joining the ends of a bit, from Old French, from gourmer, to bridle.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From obsolete French gromette ("curb chain") (modern spelling gourmette).

Examples

Comments

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  • There was a kid's show called "Wallace and Grommet."

    June 9, 2012

  • Mrs Simpson's pet name for her abdicating Windsor.

    January 23, 2008

  • I love Gromit. :-)

    January 23, 2008

  • Not to be confused with Gromit.

    January 23, 2008

  • or the hickey doo where sweatshirt strings come out of the hood.

    May 17, 2007

  • The plastic ring in a hole that protects cables running through the hole, as well as reinforces the hole itself. If that doesn't make sense, check a nearby desk, bookcase, or other piece of office furniture. It'll likely have one, or two.

    May 16, 2007