Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A ringlike molding around the capital of a pillar.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A small ring.
  • n. A ring-shaped molding at the top of a column
  • n. A small circle borne as a charge in coats of arms.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A little ring.
  • n. A small, flat fillet, encircling a column, etc., used by itself, or with other moldings. It is used, several times repeated, under the Doric capital.
  • n. A little circle borne as a charge.
  • n. A narrow circle of some distinct color on a surface or round an organ.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A little ring.
  • n. Specifically — In architecture, a small projecting member, circular in plan and usually square or angular in section; especially, one of the fillets or bands which encircle the lower part of the Doric capital above the necking: but annulet is often indiscriminately used as synonymous with list, listel, cincture, fillet, tenia, etc.
  • n. In heraldry, a ring borne as a charge. It is also the mark of cadency which the fifth brother of a family ought to bear on his coat of arms. Also called anlet. See cadency.
  • n. In decorative art, a name given to a band encircling a vase or a similar object, whether solidly painted, or in engobe, or composed of simple figures placed close to each other. Compare frieze.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a small ring
  • n. (heraldry) a charge in the shape of a circle
  • n. molding in the form of a ring; at top of a column

Etymologies

Latin ānulus, ring; see annulus + -et.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Latin annulus ("small ring"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

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  • In heraldry, a small circle worn as a charge in coats of arms.

    February 6, 2007