Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. One of above average weight.
  • n. The heaviest weight division in professional boxing, having no upper limit, with contestants usually weighing more than 190 pounds (85.5 kilograms).
  • n. A boxer competing in this weight division.
  • n. A similar weight division in other sports, such as weightlifting.
  • n. A contestant in this weight division.
  • n. Informal A person of great importance or influence.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A very large, heavy, or impressive person.
  • n. The professional boxing weight division for boxers weighing more than 190 pounds; a boxer in that division.
  • n. A similar division and contestant in other sports.
  • adj. Of the heavyweight boxing (or similar) division.
  • adj. Being relatively heavy.
  • adj. Being a leader in one's field.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. in wrestling, boxing, etc., a term applied to the heaviest of the classes into which contestants are divided. Cf. Feather weight (c), under Feather.
  • adj. heaviest in a category.
  • n. a wrestler who weighs more than 214 pounds.
  • n. a boxer who weighs more than 195 pounds.
  • n. a very large person.
  • n. a person of exceptional importance and reputation.
  • n.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A person whose weight exceeds the average; specifically, a boxer or other contestant whose weight places him in the highest of the four grades or classes of contestants recognized by sporting men, the others being middle-weight, light-weight, and feather-weight.
  • n. A person of weight or importance; one of much influence.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a professional boxer who weighs more than 190 pounds
  • n. a very large person; impressive in size or qualities
  • n. a person of exceptional importance and reputation
  • n. an amateur boxer who weighs no more than 201 pounds
  • n. a wrestler who weighs more than 214 pounds

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • We lay out four contrasting approaches to development project organization and focus particular attention on what we call heavyweight project teams.

    Managing New Product and Process Development

  • Dereck Chisora and his promoter Frank Warren claim the unbeaten London heavyweight is fighting the two-belt world champion Wladimir Klitschko in Germany on 11 December for the same money David Haye rejected.

    Dereck Chisora delighted with three-fight deal for Klitschkos' titles

  • Both parties drafted in heavyweight lawyers in their battle to win what will become a test case for family law.

    Landmark ruling for prenups in battle of multimillionaire heiress and her ex

  • Another side effect of becoming the industry heavyweight is going the way of ebay and becoming overly commercial. craiglist is struggling with this now where smaller or regional sites like unclehenrys. com consciously control the commercial side to enable individuals to get noticed, not just businesses. —

    Paying for Ads When Craigslist Is Free - Bits Blog - NYTimes.com

  • The ranking also only looks at investors originally formed in Europe, so long-term heavyweight investors, such as fund-of-funds managers HarbourVest and Adams Street, family office Auda, and Canadian pension funds Ontario Teachers and Canada Pension Plan missed out.

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  • The Sydney gold medalist in heavyweight Greco-Roman wrestling beat Lithuania's Mindaugas Mizgaitis 3-0.

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  • Gardner, who recently won the Olympic gold medal in heavyweight wrestling, can have the job.

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  • He has been a long-term heavyweight on Colombia's political scene who has served as a cabinet minister under three presidents, including Cesar Gaviria and Andres

    openDemocracy

  • Brother Bret was then entrenched in the WWF as half of the Hart Foundation (along with Jim "the Anvil" Neidhart); Bret was a star, but certainly nobody would have predicted his future as a longterm heavyweight champion, as he was several inches too short and several degrees too plain next to the likes of Hulk

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  • "David and I both know that this fight with Ruiz is a massive banana skin in David's plans of becoming a long-term heavyweight champion and unifying the titles," Booth said.

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