Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Expressing a command or plea; peremptory: requests that grew more and more imperative.
  • adj. Having the power or authority to command or control.
  • adj. Grammar Of, relating to, or constituting the mood that expresses a command or request.
  • adj. Impossible to deter or evade; pressing: imperative needs. See Synonyms at urgent.
  • n. A command; an order.
  • n. An obligation; a duty: social imperatives.
  • n. A rule, principle, or instinct that compels a certain behavior: a people driven to aggression by territorial imperatives.
  • n. Grammar The imperative mood.
  • n. Grammar A verb form of the imperative mood.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The grammatical mood expressing an order (see jussive). In English, the imperative form of a verb is the same as that of the bare infinitive.
  • n. A verb in imperative mood.
  • n. An essential action, a must: something which is imperative.
  • adj. essential
  • adj. Having a semantics that incorporates mutable variables.
  • adj. of, or relating to the imperative mood

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Expressive of command; containing positive command; authoritatively or absolutely directive; commanding; authoritative.
  • adj. Not to be avoided or evaded; obligatory; binding; compulsory.
  • adj. Expressive of commund, entreaty, advice, or exhortation.
  • n. The imperative mood; also, a verb in the imperative mood.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Expressing command; containing positive command; peremptory; absolute: as, imperative orders.
  • Not to be avoided or evaded; that must be attended to or performed; obligatory; binding: as, an imperative duty or necessity.
  • n. In grammar, a mode or verbal form which expresses command, entreaty, advice, or exhortation.
  • n. In philosophy, a deliverance of conscience; a monition of the moral sense.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. relating to verbs in the imperative mood
  • n. some duty that is essential and urgent
  • n. a mood that expresses an intention to influence the listener's behavior
  • adj. requiring attention or action

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Middle English imperatif, relating to the imperative mood, from Old French, from Late Latin imperātīvus, from Latin imperātus, past participle of imperāre, to command; see emperor.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Latin imperātīvus.

Examples

Comments

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  • To maintain a very good health, it is imperative to avoid smoking and drinking.

    February 15, 2013