Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A large drinking bowl.
  • n. The amount that such a bowl contains.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. a large vessel for drinking
  • n. the contents or quantity of the contents of such a vessel

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A large drinking vessel; also, its contents.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A bowl or drinking-vessel with liquor in it; also, the contents of such a vessel: as, to mix a, jorum of punch.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a large drinking bowl

Etymologies

Perhaps after Joram, who brought vessels of silver, gold, and brass to King David (II Samuel 8:10).
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Perhaps from the Biblical Joram who "brought with him vessels of silver, and vessels of gold, and vessels of brass" Samuel II 8:10 Or perhaps from the Arabic "djara", which means "clay vase with a large opening". (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • She was confident that William had received "jorum," and that marks of it might yet be found.

    Master William Mitten: or, A Youth of Brilliant Talents, Who Was Ruined by Bad Luck

  • He kindles this heap in a twinkling, and produces a jorum of hot brandy and water; for that bottle of his keeps company with the seasons, and now holds nothing but the purest eau de vie.

    Pictures from Italy

  • Pre-Adamite sop, or the ruins of some enormous jorum of antediluvian toast-and-water.

    The Lazy Tour of Two Idle Apprentices

  • After dinner, Mr. Bob Sawyer ordered in the largest mortar in the shop, and proceeded to brew a reeking jorum of rum – punch therein, stirring up and amalgamating the materials with a pestle in a very creditable and apothecary – like manner.

    The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club

  • The Aged prepared such a hay – stack of buttered toast, that I could scarcely see him over it as it simmered on an iron stand hooked on to the top – bar; while Miss Skiffins brewed such a jorum of tea, that the pig in the back premises became strongly excited, and repeatedly expressed his desire to participate in the entertainment.

    Great Expectations

  • And as he spoke he contrived to swallow a jorum of scalding tea, containing in measure somewhat near a pint.

    Doctor Thorne

  • While Mary was preparing the sixth jorum, there came a knock at the door.

    Doctor Thorne

  • When the meal was half finished, Mrs. Henniker brought in an enormous jorum of tea, which she served out to all the guests in tin pannikins, giving to every man a fixed and ample allowance of brown sugar, without at all consulting his taste.

    John Caldigate

  • Jesus, I had to laugh at the way he came out with that about the old one with the winkers on her, blind drunk in her royal palace every night of God, old Vic, with her jorum of mountain dew and her coachman carting her up body and bones to roll into bed and she pulling him by the whiskers and singing him old bits of songs about

    Ulysses

  • So saying, the good fellow went to work to prepare a jorum of that fragrant beverage, and all hands tasted it with satisfaction.

    Five Weeks in a Balloon

Comments

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  • "(he gave the lad) a stiff jorum of the rum." - William Hope Hodgson

    April 18, 2011

  • "'Well, lads,' he exclaimed. 'What about a jorum?'
    'Isn't it remarkable?' said Foley. 'I was only just talking about it.'
    'I have noted before now, Peter,' said the sergeant, 'that you and me have what might be called a simultaneous thirst.'"
    - Frank O'Connor, 'In The Train'.

    October 10, 2008

  • Rhymes with santorum.

    July 18, 2008