Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The furthest degree or extremity, going beyond bounds or propriety.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The utmost or last extremity.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The last extremity.

Etymologies

From Old French oltrance (modern oltrance), from outrer ("pass beyond"), from oltre, outre, utre, from Late Latin ultra-. Compare outrage. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • But if the shield was touched with the sharp end of the lance, the combat was understood to be at outrance, that is, the knights were to fight with sharp weapons, as in actual battle.

    Ivanhoe. A Romance

  • But if the shield was touched with the sharp end of the lance, the combat was understood to be at "outrance", that is, the knights were to fight with sharp weapons, as in actual battle.

    Ivanhoe

  • It was an era of guerre a outrance, or war without limit, with Nazi Germany and the Axis Powers, and then the Soviet Union and its satellites, threatening America's and the West's liberal democratic values and our, and our allies', very existence.

    The Political Consequences Of The Peace

  • Charteris of Kinfauns will do battle with him to the outrance, whilst horse and man may stand, or spear and blade hold together.

    The Fair Maid of Perth

  • Turnbull perceived her intention, and caught hold of her with no very gentle grasp, saying — “Nay, lady, it is to be understood that you play your own part in the drama, which, unless you continue on the stage, will conclude unsatisfactorily to us all, in a combat at outrance between your lover and me, when it will appear which of us is most worthy of your favour.”

    Castle Dangerous

  • Know ye that valiancy lieth in endurance of outrance and that no case is so strait but that the

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Or, “though the Phocians maintained a war ‘a outrance’ with him.”

    Hellenica

  • But if the shield was touched with the sharp end of the lance, the combat was understood to be at “outrance”, that is, the knights were to fight with sharp weapons, as in actual battle.

    Ivanhoe

  • But if the shield was touched with the sharp end of the lance, the combat was understood to be at _outrance_, [46-3] that is, the knights were to fight with sharp weapons, as in actual battle.

    Journeys Through Bookland, Vol. 6

  • I must, in that case, be prepared to wage a war a outrance, in which there would be no quarter allowed, on _one_ side at least.

    She and I, Volume 1

Comments

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  • Ausgang!

    In the event of an alarm sounding, patrons are kindly requested to leave calmly by the nearest outrance.

    February 16, 2009

  • Hmmm ... They couldn't use a better definition for this? It means to the death.
    (n)The utmost or last extremity.

    February 16, 2009