myth has looked up 13 words, created 19 lists, listed 228 words, written 127 comments, added 16 tags, and loved 7 words.

Comments by myth

  • bug, bad db entry? http://www.wordnik.com/words/hubble-expansion

    January 20, 2010

  • I like wordnik much better: autocomplete, better definitions and good examples. The statistics are kind of interesting too. It even kept all the previous comments. :)

    January 3, 2010

  • P: "But you don't have a license"
    SB: "You don't need a license to drive a sandwich!"

    July 19, 2009

  • Day rattles, too,
    Stealth's slow;
    The sun has got as far
    As the third sycamore.
    Screams chanticleer.
    "Who's there?" - Emily Dickinson

    June 28, 2009

  • A rooster

    June 28, 2009

  • Time flies like an arrow, Fruit flies like a banana. - G.Marx

    Listed under the clock in studio 60

    May 25, 2009

  • Would you recommend any good audio books or youtube links? Do you prefer the iambs aggressively stressed and unstressed or read more naturally?

    I like this guy:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K4KYpisw560&feature=related

    however most end up sounding like:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cr_UN_7pkhU&feature=related

    May 23, 2009

  • @c_b: That's the best explanation I've heard. Most people just say "that's the way it was done back then." It seems strange. However, if it was done as a mnemonic device and a sort of shorthand, that makes a lot more sense. I'll feel a lot better reading it when I know there is a method to the madness.

    @rolig: The difference is that rappers aren't trying to fit a widely accepted set of rules. If you look at just the rapper's lyrics without having heard it before, it would look horrible. (Half the time I don't even want to know what they are saying.) You might have no way of knowing how to read it. It was not meant to be read. A song that lasts two minutes is a bit different then a 200 page poem. You could say that Byron or Shakespeare should be seen instead of read to be fully understood. That makes sense. I've seen a couple. I don't see any stage notes in Byron's Don Juan though. Was it meant to be a play?

    May 19, 2009

  • @madmouth: Do they spell it f're or fi'e and do it to force their sentences into iambic meter? If so, then yes. :) If the rules are so simple, why do they need to massacre the words? :)

    @rolig: The style doesn't prevent me from enjoying the other parts of the poetry. I just thought it was funny that the manipulation was so blatant without seeming to sound or appear any better for it. I'm more a fan of 1800-1900's style of writing. I just picked up Byron because Shaw, Chesterton and Fitzgerald seem to keep mentioning him and I was curious. I might not have stumbled upon his good stuff yet or just expect him to be more "poetic" with flowery words.

    May 18, 2009

  • I usually leave it out. If you use the serial comma, do you also use a comma with too?

    I like apples and oranges too.
    or
    I like apples and oranges, too.

    May 17, 2009

  • I was thinking that it might make it easier to read giving it some sort of rhythmic pace. But to make the rules so complex that they were forced to circumvent them by making square pegs fit in the round holes seems lame. Maybe they thought it made it even harder to understand enabling them to pretty much say whatever they wanted? Or maybe I just expect too much from them given all their hype.

    May 17, 2009

  • uncommon - see quotidian

    May 17, 2009

  • I just happened to be reading Byron at the moment which was littered with all these weird contractions and realized this was the reason we have so many in our language and also why I hate Shakespeare. It seems like a cop out. What is the motivation for even using iambic pentameter?
    The v seems like it would be a key component. Why not have it be ev'?

    May 17, 2009

  • I'd be interested in a graph.

    In the mean time, some polysemous Marx jokes to entertain:

    Groucho: How would you like a job at the mint?
    Chico: Mint? I don't like mint. What other flavors you got?

    I've got a good mind to go out and join a club and beat you over the head with it.

    May 17, 2009

  • Cue the Groucho Marx jokes:

    Groucho: "That's in every contract, that's what you call a sanity clause."
    Chico: "You can't a fool a me there ain't no Santy Claus"

    Minister: "We need to take up the tax"
    Groucho: "I'd like to take up the carpet."
    Minister: "I still insist we take up the tax."
    Groucho: "He's right - you've gotta take up the tacks before you can take up the carpet."

    "Do you rumba?"
    "Why, yes!"
    "Well, pick a rumba between one and ten."
    - Not sure if it counts if you misunderstand yourself. :)

    Chico: "Who are you?"
    Groucho: "Im fine, thanks. Who are you?"

    Ice Water? Get some Onions - that'll make your eyes water!

    May 17, 2009

  • I see the table is set for four.
    Why that's nothing my alarm clock is set for eight. - G Marx

    May 17, 2009

  • The "poetic" version of ever.
    I think this was done to reduce the amount of syllables for iambic pentameter. Byron's such a big fat cheater!

    May 17, 2009

  • Being common is a little different then being highly polysemous. For the list I'm using weirdnets definitions, so it's going to be a little off but still somewhat relevant.

    May 14, 2009

  • Is it an adjective? It seems more popular as an adjective in use but the dictionaries only seem to have it as a verb. I guess they are more keen on mesmeric. In England, they probably use mesmerising. :)

    May 13, 2009

  • you're as drunk as an owl! - the man who was thursday

    Though weird as it is. You can also be as drunk as a boiled owl and lots more.

    May 10, 2009

  • Apparently it can also be dawg nabbit:
    http://www.alphadictionary.com/articles/southernese.html

    May 5, 2009

  • This is, unfortunately, not a pit filled with money.

    May 4, 2009

  • The leader of an anarchist group.

    May 4, 2009

  • A curse used mostly in cartoons

    May 4, 2009

  • A curse used mostly in cartoons

    May 4, 2009

  • "Watch for a white Challenger, license plates initial OA-5599. Colorado plates. Last seen heading for Dunphy on US 40 at cruising speed. We have reason to believe that it's supercharged, so maintain double alert'til you spot it, and then call in for instructions."

    May 4, 2009

  • Is this a list of homonyms or something more specific?

    May 3, 2009

  • everything but the oink

    May 3, 2009

  • Set has 87, not bad! I like the term polysemy.

    May 3, 2009

  • Can I be frank?
    Is that your name?
    No, my name’s Godfrey.

    May 3, 2009

  • Wait a cotton pickin' minute!
    Are you out of your cotton pickin' mind?

    May 3, 2009

  • At 114 definitions, it goes to the top of the list

    May 3, 2009

  • Moses supposes his toses are roses

    May 3, 2009

  • The Thin Man Goes Home

    April 24, 2009

  • wow, it's like wordie for colors.

    April 23, 2009

  • FYI - I've put instructions to make a wordie firefox search engine here: http://wordie.org/words/firefox

    April 22, 2009

  • I also recommend this add-on which is one of my favorites:
    https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/240

    April 22, 2009

  • How to create a wordie search:
    Create a file called wordie.xml and put it here (stick this in your run command in the start menu and it will bring up your appdata folder): %AppData%\Mozilla\Firefox\Profiles\wyzwjx2f.default\searchplugins

    In the xml file, put the following. Restart firefox.
    <SearchPlugin xmlns:os="http://a9.com/-/spec/opensearch/1.1/">
    <os:ShortName>Wordie</os:ShortName>
    <os:Description>Wordie</os:Description>
    <os:InputEncoding>UTF-8</os:InputEncoding>
    <os:Image width="16" height="16">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</os:Image>
    <UpdateInterval>7</UpdateInterval><os:Url type="text/html" method="GET" template="http://wordie.org/words/searchTerms">
    </os:Url>
    </SearchPlugin>

    April 22, 2009

  • In Peer Gynt, Death is known as the Button-Moulder. God commands him to melt Peer down to a button.

    April 20, 2009

  • Desolate, Kelly Clarkson would mire in the vacuity of life

    April 18, 2009

  • Kanye, despite being disheartened, is still having a good morning

    April 18, 2009

  • Rihanna prefers a tacit chauffeur

    April 18, 2009

  • Matisyahu's sovereign has misplaced his headpiece

    April 18, 2009

  • tear you to ribbons

    April 16, 2009

  • It's curtains for you! Curtains!

    April 16, 2009

  • Soon a big hornets' nest fell out of the tree, and Roland was 'lavishly decorated' by hundreds of stinging hornets.

    April 16, 2009

  • Adding to who knew

    April 12, 2009

  • Medusa was lapidescent

    April 1, 2009

  • Also burd-alone or burd-alane

    April 1, 2009

  • It's interesting that the noun of this is resumption.

    March 31, 2009

  • land beyond the forest

    March 29, 2009

  • A man having more than one wife.

    March 28, 2009

  • A woman with two or more husbands.

    March 28, 2009

  • noun
    polygamist
    polyandrist - A woman having more than one husband
    polygynist - A man having more than one wife
    monogamist - One who practices or upholds monogamy

    noun
    pologamy, plural marriage - The condition or practice of having more than one spouse at one time.
    polyandry - the practice of a woman having more than one husband
    polygyny - the practice of a man having more than one wife
    monogomy - is the practice of each person having only one spouse

    adj
    polygynous - Relating to, characterized by, or practicing polygyny
    polyandrous - Relating to, characterized by, or practicing polyandry
    polygamous - Relating to, characterized by, or practicing polygamy
    monogamous - Relating to, characterized by, or practicing monogamy

    March 28, 2009

  • Is there a term for hunger sounds?

    March 28, 2009

  • A duel recognized as a way to settle disputes.

    March 28, 2009

  • Hearing loss occurring as part of the aging process.

    March 28, 2009

  • Its tail waved in protest as he plucked the hook free from its fibrous lip. Raising the fish to the sky, he smiled in triumph of his piscine illaqueation.

    March 28, 2009

  • <object width="425" height="344"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/CGV08KvSs-Q&hl=en&fs=1"><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/CGV08KvSs-Q&hl=en&fs=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"></embed></object>

    March 27, 2009

  • What a great word.

    March 27, 2009

  • Because piano just isn't long enough.

    March 27, 2009

  • I fear the world has another contronym.

    March 27, 2009

  • grief tourist

    March 27, 2009

  • This one is as crooked as a dog's hind leg. - Columbo

    March 23, 2009

  • Pink as in cherry blossom pink.

    March 23, 2009

  • A few more suggestions:
    Put links to words that reference the word that you are on. If someone defines scarlet as red with a link to red, it would be cool to have red automatically reference scarlet. This might make it easier for people to connect words. Think of all the links you would then see on weirdnet.

    Autocomplete/ intellisense for the search field - kind of like google. This would help people find a lot of the weird phrases/non-words.

    March 23, 2009

  • Have you seen these for reference?
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Shades_of_blue
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Shades_of_green
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Shades_of_yellow
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Shades_of_red
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Shades_of_pink
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_colors

    I like that they show the actual color. I was thinking of doing something similar. It's easy to confuse colors, so it would be interesting to see the colors next to different authors' quotes. They might also be categorized by emotion. If someone is mad versus embarrassed would different shades of red get across the emotion better?

    March 23, 2009

  • I wouldn't prevent it from being on the homepage. You could have a separate section for them on the homepage if it got too out of hand.

    Also, maybe have the option when adding tags as well since they create their own lists.

    March 23, 2009

  • Fear of frogs

    March 23, 2009

  • Ranidaphobia

    March 23, 2009

  • As I start writing some lists or browsing others, I have no idea what drew the person to a particular word. Most words have multiple definitions, a lot of none or no comments, some people put descriptions of their lists but it is still hard sometimes to determine intent. Take this for example. I've made a list of animal -ine words.

    animal -ines

    If you look at the comments, you'll see I list out a short description of each to see why they were added. (still under construction but you get the idea) You don't need to click through each word to determine what each means. It's a one stop shop.

    It would be nice if I was able to put a comment on the line where the word was listed instead of it showing (was added by myth and has been listed 24 times with 5 comments).

    March 22, 2009

  • Moved stuff to description

    March 22, 2009

  • Of or characteristic of rabbits or hares.

    March 22, 2009

  • Of or relating to a type of wildcat.

    March 22, 2009

  • A vampire

    “Will your ladyships be pleased to buy an amulet against the oupire, which is going like the wolf, I hear, through these woods,�? he said dropping his hat on the pavement. - Carmilla

    March 15, 2009

  • Welcome to my house. Come freely. Go safely; and leave something of the happiness that you bring! - Dracula

    March 15, 2009

  • But just then the moon, sailing through the black clouds, appeared behind the jagged crest of a beetling, pine-clad rock, and by its light I saw around us a ring of wolves, with white teeth and lolling red tongues, with long, sinewy limbs and shaggy hair. - Dracula

    March 15, 2009

  • Nothing could be more beautiful than her tints. - Carmilla (1872)

    March 14, 2009

  • In Styria, we, though by no means magnificent people, inhabit a castle, or schloss. - Camilla - Sheridan Le Fanu

    March 11, 2009

  • 30 helens agree: Irregardless is not a word.

    March 11, 2009

  • A perfectly normal human worm baby.

    March 9, 2009

  • Often they swam and as Amory floated lazily in the water he shut his
    mind to all thoughts except those of hazy soap-bubble lands where the
    sun splattered through wind-drunk trees. - This side of Paradise - F. Scott Fitzgerald

    March 9, 2009

  • Then shall be
    No lamp relumed in heaven, no voices crying,
    Or changing lights, or dreams and forms that hover!
    (And, heart, for all your sighing,
    That gladness and those tears are over, over. . . .)
    - Rupert Brooke

    March 9, 2009

  • And now, as the night was senescent
    And star-dials pointed to morn -
    As the star-dials hinted of morn -
    At the end of our path a liquescent
    And nebulous lustre was born,
    Out of which a miraculous crescent
    Arose with a duplicate horn -
    Astarte's bediamonded crescent
    Distinct with its duplicate horn. - Ulalume - Poe

    March 8, 2009

  • Illusion is the first of all pleasures. - Oscar Wilde

    March 8, 2009

  • The word 'politics' is derived from the word 'poly', meaning 'many', and the word 'ticks', meaning 'blood sucking parasites'. - Larry Hardiman

    March 8, 2009

  • Laziness is nothing more than the habit of resting before you get tired. - Jules Renard

    March 8, 2009

  • It's true, I was created by Mayans. :)

    March 8, 2009

  • "Children seldom misquote you. In fact, they usually repeat word for word what you shouldn't have said." - Anon

    March 8, 2009

  • Tact is the ability to tell someone to go to hell, and still have them look forward to the trip. - Sir Winston Churchill

    March 8, 2009

  • Weaseling out of things is important to learn. It's what separates us from the animals... except the weasel. - Homer Simpson

    March 8, 2009

  • "Progress is impossible without change." - shaw

    March 8, 2009

  • All vastness, the clouds are piled up like giant rocks, and there is a 'brool' over the sea that sounds like some passage of doom. Dark figures are on the beach here and there, sometimes half shrouded in the mist, and seem 'men like trees walking'. The fishing boats are racing for home, and rise and dip in the ground swell as they sweep into the harbour, bending to the scuppers. - Dracula

    March 8, 2009

  • Once he dreamt that it had come true and woke up in a cold panic, for in his dream she had been a silly, flaxen Clara, with the gold gone out of her hair and platitudes falling insipidly from her changeling tongue. - This side of Paradise - F. Scott Fitzgerald

    Hmmm...
    Was she dumb, causing her words to be dull?
    Was she acting like a silly child?
    Or was she switched a birth?

    March 2, 2009

  • No firefox search plug-in for wordie?

    February 28, 2009

  • Oooh! Bonus points for using the word maunderings. I like finding examples of words that you won't find in thesauruses even though their synonyms are listed.

    February 27, 2009

  • I stick my plate under Mom's nose, but she waves it off. I sit in Pop's old rocker, watch the storm come. Dust devils puff around on the berm, and maple sprigs land in the yard with their white bellies up.
    Across the road, our windbreak bends, rows of cedars furling every which way at once. - Pcake

    February 25, 2009

  • According to Shmoo legend, the lovable creature laid eggs, gave milk and died of sheer esctasy when looked at with hunger. The Shmoo loved to be eaten and tasted like any food desired. Anything that delighted people delighted a Shmoo. Fry a Shmoo and it came out chicken. Broil it and it came out steak. Shmoo eyes made terrific suspender buttons. The hide of the Shmoo if cut thin made fine leather and if cut thick made the best lumber. Shmoo whiskers made splendid toothpicks. The Shmoo satisfied all the world's wants. You could never run out of Shmoon (plural of Shmoo) because they multiplied at such an incredible rate.

    February 25, 2009

  • Nice! Thanks. It was driving me almonds and macadamians.

    February 22, 2009

  • Looking for a word that means a person who is guarded.

    Synonyms for guardian are guardsman and guardee

    February 22, 2009

  • Azure is a nice simple word - makes me think of the sky, no where nears as pretentious a color as incarnadine.

    February 20, 2009

  • I wanted eucalyptus floors in the hopes that koalas would come and visit. (The floors also have a nice sheen.) Unable to get eucalyptus, I am now crowded in my own home with pandas.

    February 20, 2009

  • quality is not an anathema to profit - Studio 60

    February 16, 2009

  • Now will he sit under a medlar tree,
    And wish his mistress were that kind of fruit
    As maids call medlars, when they laugh alone.
    O Romeo, that she were, O that she were
    An open-arse and thou a pop'rin pear!
    - Shakespeare

    Also: pop'rin pear

    February 16, 2009

  • Now will he sit under a medlar tree,
    And wish his mistress were that kind of fruit
    As maids call medlars, when they laugh alone.
    O Romeo, that she were, O that she were
    An open-arse and thou a pop'rin pear!
    - Shakespeare

    February 16, 2009

  • Now will he sit under a medlar tree,
    And wish his mistress were that kind of fruit
    As maids call medlars, when they laugh alone.
    O Romeo, that she were, O that she were
    An open-arse and thou a pop'rin pear!
    - Shakespeare

    Another name for a medlar

    February 16, 2009

  • Now will he sit under a medlar tree,
    And wish his mistress were that kind of fruit
    As maids call medlars, when they laugh alone.
    O Romeo, that she were, O that she were
    An open-arse and thou a pop'rin pear!
    - Shakespeare

    Also: poperin pear

    February 16, 2009

  • The noun of the word is bletting. Are prunes and raisins bletted fruit?

    February 16, 2009

  • unmitigated cad

    February 16, 2009

  • This is a pretty versatile word.


    • salient (jumping) toads
    • The young lady who was shortsighted placed a pair of glasses on her salient (protruding) nose lifted her chin and deliberately examined the person on the bench. Love Among the Artists By Bernard Shaw
    • salient (obvious) anger

    February 16, 2009

  • I'm lost in the see-through.
    Pane always needs a bath. - Lemonheads

    February 16, 2009

  • If you've got the poison, I've got the remedy.

    February 16, 2009

  • Hmmm ... They couldn't use a better definition for this? It means to the death.
    (n)The utmost or last extremity.

    February 16, 2009

  • I Am Lapidary But Not Eristic When I Use Big Words

    February 16, 2009

  • Also spelt: Rhotacism

    February 16, 2009

  • (n) A form of decay seen in fleshy, overripe fruit.

    February 16, 2009

  • I do this often with my own code as I tend to be the most active and picky consumer. :)

    February 16, 2009

  • I Am Lapidary But Not Eristic When I Use Big Words

    February 16, 2009

  • A stick thin girl who would look good in a pixie cut. :)

    Gamine is also an adjective meaning mischievous - gamine charm

    February 2, 2009

  • This definition is a little off. Per the first commenter, the word is mostly used to describe a bloodred color due to the Shakespeare quote even though prior to Shakespeare it was known to be a softer pink.

    http://www.worldwidewords.org/weirdwords/ww-inc2.htm

    February 1, 2009

  • This is one of Anthony Bourdain's favorite words. He uses it several times in his book "Kitchen confidential" as well as on his show "No reservations."

    February 1, 2009

  • What is the governing word in: "Time flies like an arrow; fruit flies like a banana?"

    Can a governing word switch parts of speech?
    flies is a verb and a noun
    like is a preposition and a verb

    Does Zeugma refer to a governing word (like the definition here) or a governing verb? Is Zuegma (governing verb) a type of syllepsis (governing word) or the other way around? Neither of my books on Rhetoric gives a definitive answer.

    October 12, 2008

  • Doc Hopper: We're a small-time operation, but we're expanding, expanding! Just like you frogs expand. Don't you frogs expand?
    *blows out his cheeks*
    Kermit the Frog: That's a myth!
    Doc Hopper: A what?
    Kermit the Frog: Myth! Myth!
    "Myth": Yeth?
    Kermit the Frog: Good grief, it's a running gag.
    - The Muppet Movie

    September 23, 2008

  • (n): A fictitious story, person, or thing
    (n): me, myself and I

    September 23, 2008

  • I think it apt to include eggcorn :)
    http://eggcorns.lascribe.net/

    September 23, 2008

  • misspelling of recumbent ?

    September 21, 2008

  • "Enter your password then press octothorpe!"

    FYI- This word is so scarcely used that even Firefox's spellchecker doesn't even recognize it.

    September 21, 2008

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