Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The murdering of one's father, mother, or other near relative.
  • n. One who commits such a murder.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Someone who kills a relative, especially a parent.
  • n. The killing of a relative, especially a parent.
  • n. The killing of a ruler, or other authority figure; treason.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Properly, one who murders one's own father; in a wider sense, one who murders one's father or mother or any ancestor.
  • n. The act or crime of murdering one's own father or any ancestor.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. One who murders his father or mother.
  • n. One who murders any ancestor or any one to whom he owes reverence; also, in old use, one who kills his child.
  • n. The murder of a parent or of one to whom reverence is due.
  • n. Figuratively, one who commits treason against his country.
  • n. Figuratively, the crime of treason against one's country.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. someone who kills his or her parent
  • n. the murder of your own father or mother

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Latin parricīda and parricīdium : pāri-, parri-, kin + -cīda, -cīdium, -cide.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle French parricide, from Latin parricida, of uncertain origin.

Examples

Comments

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  • "The sale of absolutions was the source of large fortunes to the priests ... God's pardon for crimes already committed, or about to be committed, was advertised according to a graduated tariff. Thus, poisoning, for example, was absolved for eleven ducats, six livres tournois. Absolution for incest was afforded at thirty-six livres, three ducats. Perjury came to seven livres and three carlines. Pardon for murder, if not by poison, was cheaper. Even a parricide could buy forgiveness at God's tribunal at one ducat, four livres, eight carlines."

    - 'The Rise of the Dutch Republic', John Lothrop Motley, 1855.

    February 19, 2008