Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A thick sticky slippery substance.
  • n. Biology A mucous substance secreted by certain animals, such as catfishes and slugs.
  • n. Soft moist earth; mud.
  • n. A slurry containing very fine particulate matter.
  • n. Vile or disgusting matter.
  • n. Slang A despicable or repulsive person.
  • transitive v. To smear with slime.
  • transitive v. To remove slime from (fish to be canned, for example).

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Soft, moist earth or clay, having an adhesive quality; viscous mud; any substance of a dirty nature, that is moist, soft, and adhesive; bitumen; mud containing metallic ore, obtained in the preparatory dressing.
  • n. Any mucilaginous substance; or a mucus-like substance which exudes from the bodies of certain animals, such as snails or slugs.
  • n. Human flesh, seen disparagingly; mere human form.
  • n. = Jew’s slime (bitumen)
  • v. To coat with slime.
  • v. To besmirch or disparage.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Soft, moist earth or clay, having an adhesive quality; viscous mud.
  • n. Any mucilaginous substance; any substance of a dirty nature, that is moist, soft, and adhesive.
  • n. Bitumen.
  • n. Mud containing metallic ore, obtained in the preparatory dressing.
  • n. A mucuslike substance which exudes from the bodies of certain animals.
  • transitive v. To smear with slime.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Any soft, ropy, glutinous, or viscous substance.
  • n. Asphalt or bitumen.
  • n. A mucous, viscous, or glutinous substance exuded from the bodies of certain animals, notably fishes and mollusks: as, the slime of a snail. In some cases this slime is the secretion of a special gland, and it may on hardening form a sort of operculum. See slime-gland, clausiliumt and hibernaculum, 3 .
  • n. Figuratively, anything of a clinging and offensive nature; cringing or fawning words or actions.
  • n. In metallurgy, ore reduced to a very fine powder and held in suspension in water, so as to form a kind of thin ore-mud: generally used in the plural.
  • To cover with or as with slime; make slimy.
  • To remove slime from, as fish for canning.
  • To become slimy: acquire slime.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. any thick, viscous matter
  • v. cover or stain with slime

Etymologies

Middle English, from Old English slīm.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Old English slīm, from Proto-Germanic. Cognates include Dutch slijm, German Schleim ("mucus, slime"), also see Latin limus ("mud"), Ancient Greek λίμνη (límnē, "marsh"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

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  • He dreamed of mellowing his pigments as the Old Masters had done--with honey, fig juice, poppy oil, and the slime of pink snails.
    --Vladimir Nabokov, 1957, Pnin, p. 67

    November 16, 2007