Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Soil composed of a mixture of sand, clay, silt, and organic matter.
  • n. A mixture of moist clay and sand, and often straw, used especially in making bricks and foundry molds.
  • transitive v. To fill, cover, or coat with loam.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A kind of soil; an earthy mixture of clay and sand, with organic matter to which its fertility is chiefly due.
  • v. To cover, smear, or fill with loam.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A kind of soil; an earthy mixture of clay and sand, with organic matter to which its fertility is chiefly due.
  • n. A mixture of sand, clay, and other materials, used in making molds for large castings, often without a pattern.
  • intransitive v. To cover, smear, or fill with loam.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A soil consisting of a natural mixture of clay and sand, the latter being present in sufficient quantity to overcome the tendency of the clay to form a coherent mass.
  • n. In founding, a mixture of sand, clay, sawdust, straw, etc., used in making the molds for castings. The compound must be plastic when wet, and hard, air-tight, and able to resist high temperatures when dry. Specifically called casting-loam.
  • n. A vessel of clay; an earthen vessel.
  • To cover or coat with loam; clay.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a rich soil consisting of a mixture of sand and clay and decaying organic materials

Etymologies

Middle English lam, lom, clay, from Old English lām; see lei- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Old English lām. (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

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  • Loam-humps, he says, moles shunt
    up from delved worm-haunt

    from "Ode for Ted," Sylvia Plath

    April 14, 2008