Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Derogatory in a malicious, superior way.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Sharp.
  • adj. Characterised by low cunning and sharp practise.
  • adj. Disparaging or derisive in an insinuative way.
  • adj. Tricky; deceptive; false; spurious; contemptible.
  • n. An underhanded, tricky person given to sharp practise; a sharper; a beat.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Tricky; deceptive; contemptible
  • adj. derogatory in an insinuating manner.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Sharp; characterized by low cunning and sharp practice; tricky; also, false; spurious.
  • n. An underhanded, tricky person given to sharp practice; a sharper: a beat.
  • n. A spurious object; a humbug; a fake; something designed to cheat.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. expressive of contempt

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Origin unknown.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From earlier snithe ("sharp, cutting"), from Middle English snith ("sharp"), from Middle English snithen ("to cut"), from Old English snīþan ("to cut, make an incision"), from Proto-Germanic *snīþanan (“to cut”), from Proto-Indo-European *sneyt- (“to cut”). More at snithe.

Examples

Comments

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  • *gigglesnort*

    October 19, 2008

  • No. Words can have but one meaning.

    October 18, 2008

  • could this also mean cutting; sarcastic? as in "she answered with yet another snide remark"

    October 18, 2008

  • British slang - counterfeit.

    October 4, 2008