Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To eat or drink (something) or engage in eating or drinking by taking small swallows or mouthfuls: supped the hot soup; supped away daintily.
  • n. A small swallow or mouthful of liquid food; a sip.
  • intransitive v. To eat an evening meal; have supper.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. supremum
  • v. To sip; to take a small amount of food or drink into the mouth, especially with a spoon.
  • n. A sip; a small amount of food or drink.
  • v. To take supper.
  • interj. what's up (either as a greeting or actual question).

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To take into the mouth with the lips, as a liquid; to take or drink by a little at a time; to sip.
  • n. A small mouthful, as of liquor or broth; a little taken with the lips; a sip.
  • intransitive v. To eat the evening meal; to take supper.
  • transitive v. To treat with supper.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To take into the mouth with the lips, as a liquid; take or drink by a little at a time; sip.
  • To eat with a spoon.
  • To treat with supper; give a supper to; furnish supper for.
  • To eat the evening meal; take supper; in the Bible, to take the principal meal of the day (a late dinner).
  • To take in liquid with the lips; sip.
  • To eat with a spoon.
  • n. A small mouthful, as of liquor or broth; a little taken with the lips; a sip.
  • An abbreviation of superfine
  • of superior;
  • of superlative
  • of supine
  • of supplement
  • of supra
  • of supreme.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a small amount of liquid food
  • v. take solid or liquid food into the mouth a little at a time either by drinking or by eating with a spoon

Etymologies

Middle English soupen, from Old English sūpan; see seuə-2 in Indo-European roots.
Middle English soupen, from Old French souper, from soupe, soup; see soup.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English suppen, from Old English sūpan ("to swallow, sip"), from Proto-Germanic *sūpanan (compare Dutch zuipen ("to drink, tipple, booze"), German saufen ("to drink, booze"), Swedish supa ("to swallow, drink")), from Proto-Indo-European *sub-, compare Sanskrit súpas 'soup, broth'), from *seue 'to take liquid'. More at suck. (Wiktionary)
From Middle English soupen, suppen, Anglo-Norman super, from supe, soupe. More at soup. (Wiktionary)
aphetic form of what's up ("How are you doing?") (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

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  • I think we agree on McCourt.

    December 13, 2008

  • Wassup?

    Sweet lord mother o God, not that bastard Synge.

    "holy water in the dark f***ing nights after Samhain" my bloody ass! What a prick!

    December 13, 2008

  • "MAURYA (Raising her head and speaking as if she did not see the people around her.):
    They're all gone now, and there isn't anything more the sea can do to me. . . . I'll have no call now to be up crying and praying when the wind breaks from the south, and you can hear the surf is in the east, and the surf is in the west, making a great stir with the two noises, and they hitting one on the other. I'll have no call now to be going down and getting Holy Water in the dark nights after Samhain, and I won't care what way the sea is when the other women will be keening. (To Nora). Give me the Holy Water, Nora, there's a small sup still on the dresser."
    - J. M. Synge, 'Riders to the Sea'.

    December 13, 2008

  • Pus in reverse.

    November 3, 2007