Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A short, heavy cape of coarse cloth formerly worn outdoors.
  • n. A tunic or capelike garment worn by a knight over his armor and emblazoned with his coat of arms.
  • n. A similar garment worn by a herald and bearing his lord's coat of arms.
  • n. An embroidered pennant attached to a trumpet.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A silk banner attached to a bugle or trumpet.
  • n. A woman's or girl's sleeveless jerkin or loose overgarment.
  • n. A sleeveless garment made of coarse cloth formerly worn outdoors by the common people.
  • n. A cape or tunic worn by a knight, emblazoned with the coat of arms of his king or queen on the front.
  • n. A similar garment officially worn by a herald and emblazoned with his sovereign's coat of arms.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A sort of tunic or mantle formerly worn for protection from the weather. When worn over the armor it was commonly emblazoned with the arms of the wearer, and from this the name was given to the garment adopted for heralds.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A cloak of rough and heavy material, formerly worn by persons whose business led them to much exposure. The French tabard is described as being of serge. It was worn by the poorest classes of the populace.
  • n. A loose outer garment without sleeves, or with short sleeves, worn by knights over their armor, generally but not always embroidered with the arms of the wearer, called cote-armour by Chaucer. Also called tabard of arms.
  • n. A sort of coat without sleeves, or with short sleeves, worn by heralds and pursuivants, emblazoned with the arms of their sovereign, and considered as their distinctive garment.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a short sleeveless outer tunic emblazoned with a coat of arms; worn by a knight over his armor or by a herald

Etymologies

Middle English, from Old French tabart or Old Spanish tabardo.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Old French tabart (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

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  • From "Au Tombeau de Charles Fourier" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010