Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Alternative spelling of turnabout.
  • v. To revolve.
  • v. To reverse one's position; to turn round.
  • v. To turn (oneself) around.
  • v. To change or reverse the position of.
  • v. To turn (something) one way and then another; to move about.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Manstein was ordered to turn about and place himself under the 16th Army.

    Barbarossa

  • I took it into my head to turn about and to go to Salins, under the pretense of going to see M. de M.rian, the nephew of M. Dupin, who had an employment at the salt-works, and formerly had given me many invitations to his house.

    The Confessions of J J Rousseau

  • Then he will feel thatin a universe where planets revolve around suns, and moons turn about planets, where force alone forever masters weakness, compelling it to be an obedientslave or else crushing it, there can be no special laws for man.

    Mein Kampf

  • He made the destrier rear and turn about like a seasoned veteran of the lists.

    My Demon's Kiss

  • Sir Godfrey, I am sure you would enjoy taking a turn about the ice with Miss Moore.

    Ungrateful Governess

  • He can go up against gravitation in a balloon, and why should he not hope that ultimately he may be able to stop or accelerate his drift along the Time-Dimension, or even turn about and travel the other way? '

    The Time Machine

  • Every other time we've gone out Grayder, Shelton and Bidworthy have lectured us in turn about creating a favourable impression, behaving in a spacemanlike manner and so forth.

    Science Fiction Hall of Fame

  • Old Jimmy Wyke and his brothers, who played accordions, must practise together and take turn about with the radio-gramophone.

    Died in the Wool

  • She turned her attention to a gentleman who had approached to greet the ladies and exchange civilities before inviting Miss Pope to take a turn about the room with him.

    Dancing with Clara

  • What he did do, with bristling neck-hair, was to stalk stiff-leggedly across the cage, turn about with his face toward the danger, and stalk stiffly back, coming to a pause alongside of Jack, who gave him a good-natured sniff of greeting.

    CHAPTER XXIX

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