Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A small tower or tower-shaped projection on a building.
  • n. A low, heavily armored structure, usually rotating horizontally, containing mounted guns and their gunners or crew, as on a warship or tank.
  • n. A domelike gunner's enclosure projecting from the fuselage of a combat aircraft.
  • n. A tall wooden structure mounted on wheels and used in ancient warfare by besiegers to scale the walls of an enemy fortress.
  • n. An attachment for a lathe consisting of a rotating cylindrical block holding various cutting tools.
  • n. A rotating device holding various lenses, as for a microscope, allowing easy switching from one lens to another.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. a little tower, frequently a merely ornamental structure at one of the corners of a building or castle
  • n. a siege tower; a movable building, of a square form, consisting of ten or even twenty stories and sometimes one hundred and twenty cubits high, usually moved on wheels, and employed in approaching a fortified place, for carrying soldiers, engines, ladders, casting bridges, and other necessaries
  • n. an armoured, rotating gun installation, on a fort, ship, aircraft, or armoured fighting vehicle
  • n. the elevated central portion of the roof of a passenger car. Its sides are pierced for light and ventilation
  • n. a tower-like solder post on a turret board (a circuit board with posts instead of holes)

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A little tower, frequently a merely ornamental structure at one of the angles of a larger structure.
  • n. A movable building, of a square form, consisting of ten or even twenty stories and sometimes one hundred and twenty cubits high, usually moved on wheels, and employed in approaching a fortified place, for carrying soldiers, engines, ladders, casting bridges, and other necessaries.
  • n. A revolving tower constructed of thick iron plates, within which cannon are mounted. Turrets are used on vessels of war and on land.
  • n. The elevated central portion of the roof of a passenger car. Its sides are pierced for light and ventilation.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n.
  • n. An attachment to a lathe, drill, boring-machine, or slotting-machine designed to hold and present to the work a series of boring-, drilling-, or cutting-tools, the object being to save the time lost in changing from one tool to another by hand.
  • n. A little tower rising from or otherwise connected with a larger building; a small tower, often crowning or finishing the angle of a wall, etc.
  • n. In medieval warfare, a movable building of a square form, consisting of ten or even twenty stories, and sometimes 180 feet high, usually moved on wheels, and employed in approaches to a fortified place for carrying soldiers, engines, ladders, etc.
  • n. Milit., a tower, often revolving, for offensive purposes, on land or water. See cut under monitor.
  • n. In her.: A small slender tower, usually forming part of a bearing, being set upon a larger tower. Sec turreted, 3.
  • n. A bearing representing a kind of scepter having both ends alike and resembling the ends of the cross avellane. See tirret.
  • n. In a railroad-car of American model, the raised part of the middle of the roof, utilized for affording light and ventilation.
  • n. In a lathe, a cylindrical or polygonal block on the bed, with holes around it for dies.
  • n. Same as terret.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a self-contained weapons platform housing guns and capable of rotation
  • n. a small tower extending above a building

Etymologies

Middle English turet, from Old French torete, diminutive of tor, tower; see tower.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Old English touret, Old French tourette, diminutive of tour a tower, Latin turris. See tower (Wiktionary)

Examples

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