Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A long journey to a foreign or distant place, especially by sea.
  • n. The events of a journey of exploration or discovery considered as material for a narrative. Often used in the plural.
  • n. Such a narrative.
  • intransitive v. To make a voyage.
  • transitive v. To sail across; traverse: voyaged the western ocean.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A long journey; especially by ship.
  • v. To go on a long journey.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Formerly, a passage either by sea or land; a journey, in general; but not chiefly limited to a passing by sea or water from one place, port, or country, to another; especially, a passing or journey by water to a distant place or country.
  • n. The act or practice of traveling.
  • n. Course; way.
  • intransitive v. To take a voyage; especially, to sail or pass by water.
  • transitive v. To travel; to pass over; to traverse.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Formerly, a passage or journey by land or by sea; now only a journey or passage by sea or water from one place, port, or country to another, especially a passing or journey by water to a distant place or country: as, a voyage to India.
  • n. plural A book of voyages: used like travels.
  • n. The practice of traveling.
  • n. A way or course taken; an attempt or undertaking; an enterprise; an expedition.
  • n. = Syn. 1. Trip, Excursion, etc. (see journey), cruise, sail.
  • To take a journey or voyage; especially, to sail or pass by water.
  • To travel; pass over; traverse.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. an act of traveling by water
  • n. a journey to some distant place
  • v. travel on water propelled by wind or by other means

Etymologies

Middle English, from Old French veyage, from Late Latin viāticum, a journey, from Latin, provisions for a journey, from neuter of viāticus, of a journey, from via, road.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Middle English viage, from Anglo-Norman viage, from Old French voiage, from Latin viaticum. The modern spelling is under the influence of Modern French voyage. (Wiktionary)

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