Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To call on socially: visit friends.
  • transitive v. To go to see or spend time at (a place) with a certain intent: visit a museum; visited London.
  • transitive v. To stay with as a guest.
  • transitive v. To go to see in an official or professional capacity: visited the dentist; a priest visiting his parishioners.
  • transitive v. To go or come to: visits the bank on Fridays.
  • transitive v. To go to see in order to aid or console: visit the sick and dying.
  • transitive v. To make itself known to or seize fleetingly: was visited by a bizarre thought.
  • transitive v. To afflict or assail: A plague visited the village.
  • transitive v. To inflict punishment on or for; avenge: The sins of the ancestors were visited on their descendants.
  • intransitive v. To make a visit.
  • intransitive v. Informal To converse or chat: Stay and visit with me for a while.
  • n. The act or an instance of visiting a person, place, or thing.
  • n. A stay or sojourn as a guest.
  • n. The act of visiting in a professional capacity.
  • n. The act of visiting in an official capacity, such as an inspection or examination.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A single act of visiting.
  • n. A meeting with a doctor at their surgery or the doctor's at one's home.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To go or come to see, as for the purpose of friendship, business, curiosity, etc.; to attend; to call upon.
  • transitive v. To go or come to see for inspection, examination, correction of abuses, etc.; to examine, to inspect
  • transitive v. To come to for the purpose of chastising, rewarding, comforting; to come upon with reward or retribution; to appear before or judge
  • intransitive v. To make a visit or visits; to maintain visiting relations; to practice calling on others.
  • n. The act of visiting, or going to see a person or thing; a brief stay of business, friendship, ceremony, curiosity, or the like, usually longer than a call
  • n. The act of going to view or inspect; an official or formal inspection; examination; visitation.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To go or come to see (a person or thing) in the way of friendship, business, curiosity, ceremony, or duty; call upon; proceed to in order to view or look on.
  • To come or go to, in general; appear in or at; enter.
  • To go or come to see for the purpose of inspection, supervision, examination, correction of abuses, or the like; examine; inspect.
  • To afflict; overtake or come upon: said especially of diseases or calamities.
  • In Scriptural phraseology: To send a judgment from heaven upon, whether for the purpose of chastising or afflicting, or of comforting or consoling; judge.
  • To inflict punishment for (guilt) or upon (a person).
  • To practise going to see others; keep up friendly intercourse by going to the houses of friends; make calls; stay with (another) as a guest.
  • n. The act of visiting or going to see a person, place, or thing; a temporary residence in a locality or with some one as a guest; a call on a person or at a place.
  • n. A formal or official call; a visitation.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. go to see a place, as for entertainment
  • n. the act of visiting in an official capacity (as for an inspection)
  • n. the act of going to see some person or place or thing for a short time
  • v. come to see in an official or professional capacity
  • v. assail
  • v. pay a brief visit
  • v. stay with as a guest
  • n. the act of going to see some person in a professional capacity
  • v. go to certain places as for sightseeing
  • n. a temporary stay (e.g., as a guest)
  • v. talk socially without exchanging too much information
  • n. a meeting arranged by the visitor to see someone (such as a doctor or lawyer) for treatment or advice
  • v. impose something unpleasant

Etymologies

Middle English visiten, from Old French visiter, from Latin vīsitāre, frequentative of vīsere, to want to see, go to see, from vidēre, to see.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Latin vīsitō, frequentative of vīsō ("behold, survey"), from videō ("see"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

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