Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Any of numerous cultivated forms of a widely grown, usually tall annual cereal grass (Zea mays) bearing grains or kernels on large ears.
  • n. The grains or kernels of this plant, used as food for humans and livestock or for the extraction of an edible oil or starch. Also called Indian corn, maize.
  • n. An ear of this plant.
  • n. Chiefly British Any of various cereal plants or grains, especially the principal crop cultivated in a particular region, such as wheat in England or oats in Scotland.
  • n. A single grain of a cereal plant.
  • n. A seed or fruit of various other plants, such as a peppercorn.
  • n. Corn snow.
  • n. Informal Corn whiskey.
  • n. Slang Something considered trite, dated, melodramatic, or unduly sentimental.
  • transitive v. To cause to form hard particles; granulate.
  • transitive v. To season and preserve with granulated salt.
  • transitive v. To preserve (beef, for example) in brine.
  • transitive v. To feed (animals) with corn or grain.
  • intransitive v. To form hard particles; become grainy: "After the snow melts all day, it corns up at night for fine conditions” ( Hatfield Valley Advocate).
  • n. A horny thickening of the skin, usually on or near a toe, resulting from pressure or friction. Also called clavus.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A cereal plant grown for its grain, specifically the main such plant grown in a given region, such as oats in parts of Scotland and Ireland, wheat or barley in England and Wales, and maize or sweetcorn in the Americas.
  • n. A type of grain of the species Zea mays, maize
  • n. A grain or seed, especially of cereal crops.
  • v. To granulate; to form a substance into grains.
  • v. To preserve using coarse salt, e.g. corned beef
  • v. To provide with corn (typically maize) for feed.
  • n. A callus on the foot.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A thickening of the epidermis at some point, esp. on the toes, by friction or pressure. It is usually painful and troublesome.
  • n. A single seed of certain plants, as wheat, rye, barley, and maize; a grain.
  • n. The various farinaceous grains of the cereal grasses used for food, as wheat, rye, barley, maize, oats.
  • n. a tall cereal plant (Zea mays) bearing its seeds as large kernels in multiple rows on the surface of a hard cylindrical ear, the core of which (the cob) is not edible; -- also called Indian corn and, in technical literature, maize. There are several kinds; as, yellow corn, which grows chiefly in the Northern States, and is yellow when ripe; white corn or southern corn, which grows to a great height, and has long white kernels; sweet corn, comprising a number of sweet and tender varieties, grown chiefly at the North, some of which have kernels that wrinkle when ripe and dry; pop corn, any small variety, used for popping. Corn seeds may be cooked while on the ear and eaten directly, or may be stripped from the ear and cooked subsequently. The term Indian corn is often used to refer to a primitive type of corn having kernels of varied color borne on the same cob; it is used for decoration, especially in the fall.
  • n. The plants which produce corn, when growing in the field; the stalks and ears, or the stalks, ears, and seeds, after reaping and before thrashing.
  • n. A small, hard particle; a grain.
  • transitive v. To preserve and season with salt in grains; to sprinkle with salt; to cure by salting; now, specifically, to salt slightly in brine or otherwise.
  • transitive v. To form into small grains; to granulate.
  • transitive v. To feed with corn or (in Sctland) oats.
  • transitive v. To render intoxicated.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To preserve and season with salt in grains; lay down in brine, as meat: as, to corn beef or pork.
  • To granulate; form into small grains.
  • To feed with oats, as a horse.
  • To plant with corn.
  • To render intoxicated; make drunk, as with whisky.
  • To beg corn of farmers on St. Thomas's day, December 21st.
  • To form corns or seeds in the ear or pod; kern: said of cereals or pulse.
  • n. A single seed of certain plants, especially of cereal plants, as wheat, rye, barley, and maize; a grain.
  • n. The seeds of cereal plants in general, in bulk or quantity; grain: as, corn is dear or scarce.
  • n. The plants which produce corn when growing in the field; the stalks and ears, or the stalks, ears, and seeds after reaping and before threshing: as, a field of corn; a sheaf or a shock of corn; a load of corn. The plants or stalks are included in the term corn until the seed is separated from the ears.
  • n. A small hard particle; a grain.
  • n. A thickening or callosity of the epidermis, usually with a central core or nucleus, caused by undue pressure or friction, as by boots, shoes, or implements of occupation. Corns are most common on the feet.
  • n. Any horny excrescence.
  • n. Same as corn-starch, 2.
  • n. A term applied to flour made from rice or other grain.
  • n. A recent product which consists of the finely ground grain of Indian corn exclusive of the chit or germ. It is finer than corn meal, and being nearly free from oil is of better keeping quality; but it has lost the corn flavor and lacks gluten, and hence must be used in mixture with strong wheat flour.
  • n. A brand of corn-feed made up mostly of the hulls and germs of maize-kernels.
  • n. An abbreviation of Cornish and of Cornwall.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. feed (cattle) with corn
  • n. the dried grains or kernels or corn used as animal feed or ground for meal
  • n. something sentimental or trite
  • n. ears of corn that can be prepared and served for human food
  • n. (Great Britain) any of various cereal plants (especially the dominant crop of the region--wheat in Great Britain or oats in Scotland and Ireland)
  • n. a hard thickening of the skin (especially on the top or sides of the toes) caused by the pressure of ill-fitting shoes
  • v. preserve with salt
  • n. whiskey distilled from a mash of not less than 80 percent corn
  • n. tall annual cereal grass bearing kernels on large ears: widely cultivated in America in many varieties; the principal cereal in Mexico and Central and South America since pre-Columbian times

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Middle English, grain, from Old English; see gr̥ə-no- in Indo-European roots.
Middle English corne, from Old French, horn, from Latin cornū; see ker-1 in Indo-European roots.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Old English corn, from Proto-Germanic *kurnan, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵr̥h₂nóm (“grain; worn-down”), neuter participle of Proto-Indo-European *ǵer- (“to wear down”). Cognate with Dutch koren, German Korn, Danish/Norwegian/Swedish korn; see also Russian зерно (zerno), Czech zrno, Latin grānum, Lithuanian žirnis and English grain.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Old French corn (modern French cor).

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

This use was first used in 1932, as corny, something appealing to country folk.

Examples

Comments

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  • Kindly record how you pronounce "corn", crunchysaviour.

    October 1, 2011

  • However, I could complain that none of the images have a corn maze.* The nerve!

    *I'm sure the British spelling would be corn maize.

    September 30, 2011

  • As a resident of the Cornhusker State, I was going to agree with you, cjmconnors, and complain about how only half of the pictures had fields or drawings or baskets full of corn--the rest seem to be wheat or something--but then I looked at the Century Dictionary's definitions and saw that "the word comprehends all the kinds of grain used for the food of men or of horses, but in Great Britain it is generally applied to wheat, rye, oats, and barley, and in Scotland generally restricted to oats."

    September 30, 2011

  • It's a shame the images are completely irrelevant.

    September 30, 2011

  • Snozzwhanger comes from Willy Wonka. It doesn't grab me that much, although it was kinda the right word I needed here. Vibra-twang sounds like something advertised on tv late at night *shudders*

    August 23, 2008

  • He did, sure, but he pronounces it oddly.

    August 22, 2008

  • Bilby invented corn? Great invention!

    August 22, 2008

  • I didn't feel I should, it being a bilby invention. :-)

    August 22, 2008

  • Good heavens, bilby and reesetee -- how is it that NEITHER of you bracketed vibra-twang snozzwhanger?

    August 22, 2008

  • I don't have a problem with corn here but I often cringe at how badly Australians mangle foreign words, even those that shouldn't be too difficult. At the Olympics, one of the better water polo teams comes from Mont 'n' Agro, home to lots of angry sportspeople I guess. The USA apparently has a sprinter from Wacko, Texas. Lucky he's not a politician as he would stand no chance in the presidential race against Oh bummer.

    August 22, 2008

  • Come to think of it, there is a little pocket of Pennsylvania where it's pronounced "peas."

    August 22, 2008

  • The British usually pronounce "corn" in a way that rhymes with "days" and "gaze." Strange.

    August 22, 2008

  • KWOAAARRNNN may describe the Brooklyn pronunciation, maybe...

    August 21, 2008

  • *pronounces "corn" as KWOAAARRNNN just to start a fight*

    ;)

    August 21, 2008

  • I have never, ever heard someone pronounce corn as KWOAAARRNNN. However, I have heard people say "corn." Lots of them. With no vibra-twang snozzwhanger up their noses.

    How odd.

    August 21, 2008

  • How weird that we all pronounce it "corn." We must all have something in common! ;)

    August 21, 2008

  • I pronounce it "corn", rhymes with my mispronunciations of torn, horn, born...

    August 21, 2008

  • I too pronounce it like 'corn': /kɔːn/, rhymes with 'pawn'.

    August 21, 2008

  • That's odd. I also pronounce it "corn".

    Funny old world, innit?

    August 21, 2008

  • I'm with crunchy. Who says you need a vibra-twang snozzwhanger up your nose to pronounce an R? Admittedly, I have two Filipino native speakers in my office and they do an even worse job on this word.

    August 21, 2008

  • That's odd. I pronounce it "corn."

    This is one of those words I dislike when Brits/Aussies pronounce, since they can't say an R correctly. :-)

    "Cohn." Bleh.

    August 21, 2008

  • KWOAAARRNNN.

    That's why.

    August 21, 2008

  • Why?

    August 15, 2008

  • Hate this word when pronounced by Americans.

    August 15, 2008