missanthropist has adopted , looked up 111 words, created 13 lists, listed 1948 words, written 871 comments, added 0 tags, and loved 12 words.

Comments by missanthropist

  • Proof positive that wonky is well underway and the show has hit the road.

    Also~ to work with what one's got in the moment.

    June 8, 2012

  • Impaired brain function interprets information opposite to actual meaning.

    June 8, 2012

  • Deny, Attack, Reverse Victim ~ Offender

    June 8, 2012

  • Passive aggressive social prompter. Offending party offers this play in lieu of actual apology thus switching roles & liquidating all moral responsibility or accountability for own actions.

    June 8, 2012

  • Evidently also a game, not unlike croquet played by hand among drunken hipster youth.

    June 8, 2012

  • Antiquated Egyptian drug made from mummies purported to render user immune to disease, poison, aging, etc.

    June 8, 2012

  • "a woman who emphasizes a life of passion expressed through personal style, leisurely pastimes, charm, and the cultivation of Life’s pleasures"

    April 20, 2010

  • One who studies zombies. Or the zombie sciences.

    http://www.cracked.com/article_15643_5-scientific-reasons-zombie-apocalypse-could-actually-happen.html

    July 27, 2009

  • Fear of own's own image or reflection.

    July 18, 2009

  • Ought one assume "Bork bork bork" to mean "Mr. Leopold Bloom ate with relish the inner organs of beasts and fowls"?

    July 17, 2009

  • Guilt, crime, sin. Old English

    July 17, 2009

  • adjective: Fierce, wild, savage, dire. Old English

    July 17, 2009

  • Go, walk. Old English

    July 17, 2009

  • Going, passage, flow. Old English

    July 17, 2009

  • Dwelling, home, village, &/or estate. Old English

    July 17, 2009

  • Hot, in Old English terms.

    July 17, 2009

  • I'd rather have that I~Phone. Instead. Now.

    July 17, 2009

  • If it still hurts, you're evidently not cursing enough.

    July 17, 2009

  • He can smell what's wrong with you before you can tell you are unwell.

    July 17, 2009

  • If it hurts, you aren't cursing enough.

    July 17, 2009

  • Song of terror! Old English

    July 17, 2009

  • 1} Also, moreover

    2} in addition to

    old english

    July 17, 2009

  • Addition, increase, reinforcement old english

    July 17, 2009

  • In addition to old english

    July 17, 2009

  • Just Say No.

    July 15, 2009

  • Also, a kidlet's worst fear: the parental unit's face frumpled when she was caught holding the 5 pound bag of pure sugar upon the stairwell.

    July 14, 2009

  • Freakish sort of fetish one really doesn't need to know about.

    July 1, 2009

  • If you try to pull one off of your arm, it's head will come off.

    June 26, 2009

  • Pants, for the shortie set.

    "Even it has Thomas the train on them!"

    May 25, 2009

  • "People's here!"

    April 24, 2009

  • So much for clothing.

    April 21, 2009

  • Ow! Well, I'm trying to change all that, at least.

    April 21, 2009

  • Cactus in dogshit park.

    April 21, 2009

  • How much she wanted to brush her teeth.

    April 21, 2009

  • Words listed above may be closer to my life when they first appear.

    April 21, 2009

  • It puts the paw, in the wa~wa.

    April 20, 2009

  • Mmm, nay. Have seen it about, I'm less compelled to use it.

    There is however, a girl who sells clothing under that nom de plume, on etsy.com

    April 20, 2009

  • 'Cuz sometimes you miss your bunny.

    April 20, 2009

  • Something cute in a pile.

    April 20, 2009

  • Ss in, "Hey mane, spare some air"?

    April 20, 2009

  • Also, "you don't see me'.

    April 20, 2009

  • Alex!

    April 20, 2009

  • Side effect suffered during an illness.

    April 20, 2009

  • Eggs.

    April 20, 2009

  • Veggies.

    April 20, 2009

  • Vegetables! Who knew?

    April 20, 2009

  • Like bustier, only for the other end.

    Instead of creating cleavage, this girdle gives lift and support for less~than~perky nether parts.

    April 20, 2009

  • Podcast, meet shorthand it's a brave new world, after all.

    April 20, 2009

  • Southern/urban devolution of 'shrimp'.

    April 20, 2009

  • Ew.

    April 19, 2009

  • i gots it!

    April 19, 2009

  • Hey, I Know this guy!

    April 19, 2009

  • Tolerhate?

    April 19, 2009

  • As in, the great nation of "___ ____", founded by our holy father of the order of dropping prices, Sam Walton.

    April 19, 2009

  • Wheee heee thank gawd I'm the last one to know about this:

    http://www.mistersf.com/hoc/files/hoc_onlyobamacand001.html

    April 19, 2009

  • twitterverse

    March 15, 2009

  • "You probably should get those purple bumps on your knee checked out, that might be serious".

    March 4, 2009

  • I.e, 'A roundy'.

    February 9, 2009

  • I think you mean stitster?

    That what I've heard, anyway...

    February 9, 2009

  • 0_0 Eeep!

    Wheee.... no really, what Is this?

    February 9, 2009

  • Without one, you couldn't read this right now.

    February 9, 2009

  • I'll take 2, thank yous!

    February 7, 2009

  • I shall endeavor to thoroughly forget all about this 'carnival of pain' until next time I am chasing a bus down the street & hurl the bizarre epithet in the presence of bewildered onlookers and passers~by.

    February 7, 2009

  • AAAAAAAAARRRRRRRRRRrrrgggghh mmmmmmrrrrughhhhhhmmmmyy!

    February 7, 2009

  • I forgot to expect anything out of youtube awhile ago. Hence my newfound appreciation of all things lofi and unicorny.

    February 5, 2009

  • I've been 'literally' drudging about the dregs lately, you see... . .

    February 4, 2009

  • ...Altogether, oddly familiar... . .

    February 4, 2009

  • See also, Indecisive Infant Syndrome.

    February 4, 2009

  • I have no clue where I left 'bun~feast', though it ought to still be in the 'Entropical Locales' list.

    I shall have a whole list for this sort of phenomena all on it's own before long, complete with social mores and horrors, how~tos and where fores.

    February 4, 2009

  • Curiously, I have heard not a word of this before these last few days, now everyone cannot wait to tell me that the bright little yellow flowers upon long tubular stems here are 'sour grass', and the chewing them to shreds is a common spring passtime for children.

    Oh. I get it now.

    February 4, 2009

  • Military slang for a very strong and deleterious kind of whiskey, so called because its potency is believed to turn the eyes round in their sockets, leaving the whites only visible.

    J.C. Hotten, Slang Dictionary, 1887

    February 4, 2009

  • A sea~term for the weakest grog possible~ six portions of water to each rum~ hardly enough spirit to swear by.

    J.C. Hotten, Slang Dictionary, 1887

    Given as punishment for neglect or drunkenness, instead of the usual four~water, which is one part rum, four parts water, lime~juice and sugar.

    Admiral William Smith, Sailor's Word~Book, 1867

    February 4, 2009

  • Captcha~tankerous.

    Will call the new tree fungus I discovered this until something better pops up.

    February 4, 2009

  • Frinking frack!

    *Ahem*, excuse the exclamatory astonishment. What character was this Frink?

    February 4, 2009

  • A slang term designating the drippings of glasses in saloons, collected and sold at half~price to drinkers who are not overly particular.

    Sylva Clapin, Dictionary of Americanisms, 1902

    February 4, 2009

  • Take ten gallons of ale and a large cock, the older the better; parboil the cock, flay him, and stamp him in a stone mortar till his bones are broken; then put the cock into two quarts of sack, and put it to three pounds of raisins, some blades of mace and a few cloves; put all these into a canvas bag and a little before you find the ale has done working, put the ale and bag together into a vessel; in a week or nine days time, bottle it up... Give it the same time to ripen as other ale.

    Robley Dunglison, Dictionary of Medical Science, 1844

    February 4, 2009

  • A decoction of soot taken from a chimney, believed by some to be a sovereign remedy for colic or cholera.

    John Bartlett, Dictionary of Americanisms, 1877

    February 4, 2009

  • A glass of ardent spirits, or draught of ale, given by the landlord of an inn to his guest when about to depart on horseback.

    John Jamieson, Etymological Scottish Dictionary, 1808

    February 4, 2009

  • Wine in which steel fillings have been placed for some time. It is used medicinally.

    Robert Hunter, Encyclopaedic Dictionary, 1894

    February 4, 2009

  • Among chymists, a rich cordial with pieces of gold~eaf in it.

    Nathaniel Bailey, Etymological English Dictonary, 1749

    Gold dissolved and mixed with oil of rosemary to be drank.

    John Coxe, Medical Dictionary, 1817

    February 4, 2009

  • Warm ale, spiced and sweetened, served to the guests at a funeral in quart mugs with lemon peel twisted round the handle thereof. Lancashire

    Joseph Wright, English Dialect Dictionary, 1898~1905

    February 4, 2009

  • A sweet aromatick juice or perfume so called. There is amber of four colours, white, gray, red, and black, which comes according to the variety of places or regions where it is found. The gray is preferred before all the others, and is known to be good if, when pricking it witha pin, delivers forth a moisture like oyle.

    The fume of it is good against the falling~sickness and comfortable to the brain.

    Thomas Blount, Glossographia, 1656

    Like all aromatic substances, ambergis is slightly antispasmodic and excitant, but is oftener employed as perfume than medicine.

    Robley Dunglison, Dictionary of Medical Sciences, 1844

    February 4, 2009

  • Take Sena and polypodium, each four ounces, agrimony and maidenhair, of each a small handful, scurvygrass, a quarter peck, bruise them grossly in a stone mortar, put them into a thin canvass bag, and hang the bag in nine or ten gallons of ale; when it has worked, and when it is three o four days old, it is ripe enough to be drawn off and bottled, or as you see fit; a pint at a time enough purges by sweat and urine, expelling scorbutick humours and dropsies, removing slimy matter, gravel and sand, and prevents the stone, sweetens the blood, and is god against pricking pains and the headache.

    Thomas Lupton, A Thousand Notable Things, 1579

    February 4, 2009

  • A fermented liquor made of honeyed water, obtained by thoroughly washing the comb, when drained of the honey. in a high~class brew, the comb is sometimes washed in a little fresh beer to hasten the fermentation, but the strength of the liquor is dependent upon the quantity of honey it contains. Metheglin, when well made and refined and matured by age, is a cordial of no mean order~ a homely liqueur of potent quality.

    Georgina Jackson, Shropshire Word~Book, 1879

    February 4, 2009

  • A drink, of which beer is the principal ingredient, defined about 1815 as 'hot beer mixed with gin'. In later times, a s strong mixture of beer, gin, sugar, and ginger. It was, before coffee and tea were used, commonly made to be drunk in the morning, and hence is called morning purl.

    William Whitney, Century Dictionary, 1889

    There is yet another class of itinerant dealers... the river beer~sellers, or purlmen as they are more commonly called.

    Henry Mayhew, London Labour and the London Poor, 1861

    February 4, 2009

  • A kind of strong sweet beer... supposed to have been first brewed by Christin Mumme of Brunswick in 1489. We are informed that the exclamation mum! mum! is used to express satisfaction with good liquor, and the expression of admiration might easily be taken as the name of the liquor which excited the feeling... In the same way it may be conjectured that the liqueur, mentioned by our older dramatists under the name of hum, took it s name from the hum which in this country was a recognized expression of approbation.

    Hensleigh Wedgwood, Dictionary of English Etymology, 1878

    February 4, 2009

  • You mean, Hollyrious?

    February 4, 2009

  • During the Great Plague in London, in the year of 1666, four theives, availing themselves of he public calamity, took the opportunity to plunder the hosues of the dead and dying, yet, notwithstanding, escaped the ravenous infection themselves. On its being inquired howe thet thus insured their own safety it was found that they constantly carried about them sponges of prepared vinegar, which preparation future apothecaries adopted in all infectious cases, and sold under the denomintion of theives' vinegare.

    Joseph Taylor, Antiquities Curiousae, 1819

    A kind of vinegar made by digesting rosemay tops, sage~leaves, etc.

    Robert Hunter, Encyclopaedic Dictionary, 1894

    February 4, 2009

  • Caps quilted with good things for the head.

    Elisha Cole, English Dictionary, 1713

    A sort of coif or cap, with a double bottom, between which is enclosed a mixtures of aromatic powders, having cotton for an excipiant. It was formerly used as a powerful cephalic.

    Robley Dunglison, Dictionary of Medical Sciences, 1844

    February 4, 2009

  • An herb which, steeped in drink, is said to make a woman conceive a girl.

    Nathaniel Bailey, Etymological English Dictionary, 1749

    February 4, 2009

  • The first allowance of beer to harvest men, before the begin their days work.

    Robert Forby, Vocabulary of East Anglia, 1830

    A draught before breakfast.

    Ebenezer Brewer, Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, 1898

    February 4, 2009

  • A corruption of 'three~thirds'. It denoted a draught, once popular, made up of a third each of ale, beer, and 'two~penny', in contradistinction to 'half~and~half'. This beverage was superseded in 1722 by the very similar porter, or 'entire'.

    Robert Chambers, Encyclopedia, 1874

    February 4, 2009

  • Turpentine, a sort of clear, resinous gum, distilling out of the fir tree and others. It is of two sorts, vulgar or common, or Venetian; the latter is esteemed the best, being clear, pellucid and white, and of a glass colour used as a balsam to cuts and other green wounds, and taken inwardly as diuretick, occasioning the urine to smell like violets. Boiled in water, it becomes solid, and being so prepared, is made into pills and given in venereal cases.

    The oil is used to consolidate wounds, to discuss tumours, and to strengthen nerves.

    Thomas Dyche, New General English Dictionary, 1740

    February 4, 2009

  • In pharmacy, a rosin so named from the dragon's combating with the elephant. It is moderately heavy, friable or brittle, and in the mass of a dusky red; but when powdered of a bright scarlet, it has little smell, an is of a resinous and astringent taste. It is produced from no less than four vegetables of different part of the world.

    Daniel Fenning, Royal English Dictionary, 1775

    It has been used as an astringent in hemorrhages, etc, but now is rarely employed.

    Robley Dunglison, Dictionary of medical Science, 1844

    February 4, 2009

  • Medicines to put up the nostrils to cleanse the head... or enliven the spirits ;')

    Nathaniel Bailey, Etymological English Dictionary, 1749

    February 4, 2009

  • Small beer made for present drinking,. by simply boiling small quantities of malt and hops together in a kettle; so called from being made in haste, gallopped, as it were, into beer.

    William Holloway, General Dictionary of Provencialisms, 1838

    February 4, 2009

  • A dissolution of some of the more rarify'd parts of silver, made in spirit of wine, and whetted by alkali-salts.

    Edward Phillip, New World of English Words, 1706

    This name probably was derived from some notion of the old chemists about the influence of the moon in the preparation of dissolvents.

    Samuel Johnson, Dictionary of the English Language, 1755

    February 4, 2009

  • A greasy~looking beverage, foermly sold on stalls at early morning, prepared from a powder made of the root of the Orchis masculu... Charles Lamb, in one of his papers, has left some account of this drinkable which he says was, of all preparations, the most grateful to the stomachs of young chimney~sweeps. The present generation has no knowledge of this drink, excepting that derived from books. The word 'slops' as applied to weak, warm drink, is very likely derived from the Cockney pronunciation of saloop.

    J.C. Hotten, Slang Dictionary, 1887

    February 4, 2009

  • These are formed of the roots of hyoscyamus, Job's tears, allspice steeped in brandy, or the seeds of the wild licorice vine, to suit the fancies of the prescribers. They are employed to facilitate dentition in children and to procure sleep in fever.

    Dr. Robley Dunglison, Dictonary of Medical Sciences, 1844

    February 4, 2009

  • Ale claimed as a perquisite by the blacksmith on shoeing a horse for the first time. To shoe the colt is also a quaint expression of demanding a contribution on his first introduction to any office or employment.

    William Carr, Dialect of Craven, 1828

    February 4, 2009

  • A term of praise to signify wine of superior quality. A notion pprevails that the grapes in comet years are better in flavor than in other years, either becase it is warmer and ripens them better, or because the comets themselves exercise some chemical influence on them. Thus, wines of the years 1811, 1826, 1839, 1845, 1852, 1858, 1861, et. al, have a repute.

    Ebenezer Brewer, Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, 1887

    February 4, 2009

  • Ale drunk out of doors to welcome the cuckoo's return.

    A singular custom prevails in Shropshire at this period of the year spring, which is peculiar to that county. as soon as the first cuckoo has been heard, all the labouring classes leave work, if in the middle of the day, and time is devoted to mirth and jollity over what has been called the Cuckoo Ale.

    John Brand, Observations on Popular Antiquities, 1813

    February 4, 2009

  • A poisonous liquid which excited extraordinary attention at Naples at the end of the seventeenth century. Tofana, a Sicilian woman, was strangled after having murdered hundreds of men with this poison.

    The drink is described as a transparent, tasteless water, of which five or six drops are fatal, producing death slowly, without pain, inflammation, convulsions or fever. Gradual decay of strength, disgust of life, want of appetite, and constant thirst were its more immediate effects, speedily causing... consumption. It was probably the same poison... as the Wine of Borgias.

    T. Ellwood Zell, popular Encyclopedia, 1871

    February 4, 2009

  • Extra strong ale, supposed to be drunk when the accounts are audited.

    J.C. Hotten, Slang Dictionary, 1887

    February 4, 2009

  • A mixture of strained shellac, and milk The shellac is run through cheesecloth or through the pithy part of a loaf of bread; the denatured alcohol is thus almost freed of gums and resins. Milk is added as an antidote.

    Hyman Goldin, Dictionary of American Underworld Lingo, 1950

    February 4, 2009

  • Strong new wine, used for strengthening weak liquor. Stum'd = strengthened. According to Howell, stooming wine was effected by putting herbs and infusions into it. According to Blount, "Stum is wine that has never fermented".

    James Halliwell, Dictionary of Archaic and Provincial Words, 1855

    There strength of fancy to it sweetness joyous, Unmixt with water, nor stum'd with strong lines.

    Alexander Brome, Song and Other Poems, 1661

    February 4, 2009

  • A cold infusion of tar in water, which was formerly a celebrated remedy for many chronic affectations.

    John Ogilvie, Comprehensive English Dictionary, 1865

    His way of making it is to put, I think, a gallon of water to a quart of tar, and after stirring it together, to let it stand forty~eight hours, and then pour off the clear and drink a glass of about half a pint in ye morn, and as much at five in ye aft noon. It's become as common to call for a glass of tar~water in a coffee house as a dich of tea, or coffee.

    John Whishaw, describing Berkeley's recipe for tar water, 1744

    February 4, 2009

  • A mess made with treacle, spirits of wine, etc, and used for coughs.

    James Halliwell, Dictionary of Archaic and Provincial Words, 1855

    Treacle~water is directed to be made of green walnits, rue, carduus, marigold, baum, butter~bur roots, burdock, angelica, maserwort, water~germander, Venice~treacle, mithridate, canary vinegar, and lemon juice, steeped and distilled.

    A more simple treacle~water is made from Venice~treacle with an equal quantity of brandy and vinegar. Treacle~water and treacle~vinegar are found good preservatives against putrid air.

    Ephraim Chamber, Dictionary of Arts and Sciences Supplement, 1727

    February 4, 2009

  • A tea~drinking for women, succeeded by stronger potations in the company of the other sex, and ending as might be expected, in scenes of ribaldry and debauchery. It is so~called, I believe, in Lincoln; in other places in the country it is known by the name of a Bun Feast. The custom is now obsolete, or nearly so, to the amelioration, it is hoped, of society.

    James Halliwell, Dictionary of Archaic and Provincial Words, 1855

    February 4, 2009

  • A beverage composed of wine, with spices ans sugar, strained through a cloth. It is said to have taken its name from Hippocrates' sleeve, the term apothecaries gave to a strainer. 'Ipocras" seems to have been a great favourite with our ancestors, being served up at every entertainment, public or private. it generally made a part of the last course, and was taken immediately after dinner with wafers of some other light biscuits.

    According to Pegge, it was in use at St. John's College, Cambridge, as late as the eighteenth century, and brought in at Christmas at the close of dinner.

    James Halliwell, Dictionary of Archaic and Provincial Words, 1855

    February 4, 2009

  • A cordial composed of warm porter, moist sugar, gin and nutmeg.

    James Halliwell, Dictionary of Archaic and Provincial Words, 1855

    February 4, 2009

  • a liquor sometimes made of beer, oatmeal, etc; sometimes with water, oatmeal, spices and a small dash of wine, used by women in their lying~in, being both diaphoretic and balsamic, and administered with success to those who have the small~pox.

    Daniel Fenning, Royal English Dictionary, 1775

    ...from old French CHAUDEL, a kind of gruel or broth.

    James Stormonth, English Dictionary, 1884

    February 4, 2009

  • Strong drink that clambers up the skull; a heady liquor.

    Charles Mackay, Lost beauties of the English Language, 1874

    February 4, 2009

  • A favourite liquor among the common people, composed of ale and roasted apples. The pulp of the roasted apple was worked up with the ale until this mixture formed a smooth beverage.

    Fanciful etymologies for this popular word have been thought of, but it was probably named for its smoothness, resembling the wool of lambs.

    Robert Nares, Glossary of the Works of English Authors, 1859

    February 4, 2009

  • A frothy food to be slaped' or 'slubbered up'; prepared by milking from the cow into a vessel containing wine, spirits, spice, et al.

    Hensleigh Wegdwood, Dictionary of English Etymology, 1878

    "Selibub... is goode to coole a cholerick stomacke"

    Thoomas Cogan, Haven of Health, 1584

    February 4, 2009

  • The excrement of mice and rats, formerly used both externally and internally as a remedy, but now quite properly abandoned!

    Richard Hoblyn, Medical Dictionary, 1859

    February 4, 2009

  • A tankard covered inside with pitch. The pitch gives a flavor and perhaps medicinal value to the beverage which the tankard contains.

    Pitch tankards are still used in Germany with certain kinds of beer, such as Lichtenhainer. The modern german pitch-tankards are made of wooden staves held together by wooden hoops, as the ancient English pitch-tankards were made in the same way.

    February 4, 2009

  • A drink composes of hot milk, curdled by some strong infusion.

    It was found much in favour with our ancestors, both as a luxury and medicine.

    February 4, 2009

  • Water from under a bridge over which the living pass and the dead are carried, brought in the dawn or twilight to the house of a sick person, without the bearer's speaking either going nor when returning.

    February 4, 2009

  • The water which runs off the lead... roof of the church, especially that from the chancel, where the altar is situated said to be a restorative when sprinkled upon the sick.

    February 4, 2009

  • Waters found in the hollows of tombstones; a charm for warts.

    February 4, 2009

  • o_0

    February 4, 2009

  • Seuss hip to the beatnik manifesto? hmmm...

    February 4, 2009

  • ...Where-in the word scarcely evokes the act.

    February 4, 2009

  • Ahhhh, painfully correct, sir.

    February 4, 2009

  • /frink/ v. The unknown ur-verb, fill in your own meaning. Found esp. on the Usenet newsgroup alt.fan.lemurs, where it is said that the lemurs know what `frink' means, but they aren't telling. Compare gorets.

    February 4, 2009

  • Ah~ha. How timely I find this most becoming of terms...

    February 3, 2009

  • Also: brand of pretty underthings.

    November 13, 2008

  • One for the brunch at your local vomitorium.

    November 13, 2008

  • Pertinant to diapers.

    November 13, 2008

  • it all comes of possessing such a great mind.

    October 24, 2008

  • 'And then Mrs. Fitz~Adam reappeared in Cranford, "As bold as a lion", Miss Pole said, a well~to~do widow, dressed in rustling black silk so soon after her husbands death that poor Miss Jenkins was justified in the remark she made, that "bombazine would have shown a deeper sense of her loss".'

    ~from Cranford, by Mrs. Gaskell, 1892

    I feel oddly compelled to address a select and unfavorable few as Bombazines now... . .

    October 24, 2008

  • A slogan of those 'getting away with it'. To be used similarly or in place of The Lord's Prayer. Simply break word into generic, generously sized run~on monosyllabic sentences under one's breath in times of dire oppression. Voila, instamatic mantra!

    October 24, 2008

  • just Ad delirium. Sans tremors.

    October 24, 2008

  • ???

    When, how, why or whatsit? I needs to know, 'cuz... . .

    October 24, 2008

  • "They're in my's bed", or, "I got a snotzies!"

    Neither quite mucus, fungus, nor violent threat, this phenome~ana evidently represents a class of objects rather than condition.

    October 24, 2008

  • To be repeated ad nauseum to self in the mirror, while waving a dolly.

    September 28, 2008

  • o_0

    September 24, 2008

  • Evidently a noise which stuffed toys make at one another. In greeting.

    September 24, 2008

  • Conjuring multiple conjectures...

    August 2, 2008

  • Nai'r do wells.

    August 2, 2008

  • Contra diction, to coin it's condition.

    August 1, 2008

  • They play so nicely together, isn't that precious @_o?

    August 1, 2008

  • Exciting!

    Until of course, one discovers this refers to swine.

    July 31, 2008

  • Clue #1:

    Anarchists believe that 'property is theft'.

    Clue #2:

    Property is 9/10's of the law.

    I leave you, dear reader, to deduce whom and how this might apply.

    July 31, 2008

  • Don't be so sure, Johny!

    July 31, 2008

  • One preoccupied with unusual or abnormal sexual practices.

    July 31, 2008

  • A person who collects brassieres or pictures of women wearing them.

    July 31, 2008

  • An abnormal desire to watch animals copulate.

    July 31, 2008

  • The suspicious pass~time of playing "pocket hockey".

    July 31, 2008

  • The desire to obtain sexual pleasure from massage.

    July 31, 2008

  • Hah ha, cats so are missing out ;')

    July 31, 2008

  • Sex in the bath or shower.

    July 31, 2008

  • Mmm... oddly akin unto aghast.

    July 31, 2008

  • A person who claims to prevent or cure baldness.

    July 31, 2008

  • Instruction or doctrine concerning Hell.

    July 31, 2008

  • To talk excessively.

    July 31, 2008

  • A person whose sexual partners are chosen for their intelligence and character regardless of physicality would be this.

    July 31, 2008

  • The act of blowing on a brass wind instrument.

    July 31, 2008

  • A person who eats raw flesh.

    July 31, 2008

  • 'Chicken feed'. Is that close enough for you C_B?

    July 31, 2008

  • Really now. I was in more of a 'disturbed while disjointing oneself' sort of mood.

    July 31, 2008

  • I wonder what this has in common with 'Bucolic'. The implications are damning!

    July 31, 2008

  • A mass of tangled, matted hair.

    July 31, 2008

  • The tip of the middle finger.

    July 31, 2008

  • Sexually shy.

    July 31, 2008

  • The aura of virile sexuality presumed to emanate from a man who is smoking.

    July 31, 2008

  • Unequal in sexual desires.

    July 31, 2008

  • Attraction to hairy men.

    July 31, 2008

  • A paradoxically ugly though sexually desirable person.

    July 31, 2008

  • A mania from writing ardent love letters, or an obsession with erotic writing.

    July 31, 2008

  • The bulge seen through a man's clothing created by his genitalia.

    July 31, 2008

  • Sexual pleasure derived from being whipped.

    July 31, 2008

  • Amorousness aroused by music.

    July 31, 2008

  • A woman who's aware of her attractive breasts, and who makes use of their allure.

    July 31, 2008

  • Sex in a parked car.

    July 31, 2008

  • Loss of sexual appetite because your partner has wicked B.O.

    July 31, 2008

  • v. The bobbing or jiggling of a woman's breasts when she walks, dances, or exercises.

    July 31, 2008

  • V. The involuntary act of scratching or clawing your partner in the heat of passion.

    July 31, 2008

  • *Flirtatious talk that does not lead to amorous action.*

    Not if you say it like that, Whichbe.

    July 31, 2008

  • Inextricably attached in/on/to a pirate ships.

    You know when you, or another object has become this because much arm waving, foot frolicking and shrill howling ensues.

    July 29, 2008

  • This is also a delectable lace!

    July 28, 2008

  • As in, "You Goofagus".

    July 27, 2008

  • 'little runt wolf cubs'?

    heehehah yeeee heh... eh.

    July 26, 2008

  • Not to be confused with 'The Bechtel Rule'.

    July 25, 2008

  • No way? Really! I hear this is an endangered species...

    July 23, 2008

  • Depressing observation... The monetary system is a game whose winners are ultimately only looking out over the effects of their own destructive out~of~balance greed from luxurious suite perhaps.

    funny/notfunny.

    July 23, 2008

  • Is this about those 'disposable' artsy paper dresses that went about in the 60's and 70's?

    Stupid human idea #764,982. If one can number such a thing.

    July 23, 2008

  • I've been having the nightmares about this sort of thing, lately. I had met a woman aged 26 incarcerated no less when I was 18, she'd had something like 13 kids. one set of twins.

    Oh yes, I believe in birth control. We have free vasectomies here in California, btw.

    July 23, 2008

  • Hah! Well it was translated from an old Jewish tale... maybe they forgot the crushing reality of numbering a 'myriad.'

    No sir, I can't believe it. Hurts the brain too much.

    July 23, 2008

  • Seat, chair, saddle.

    July 23, 2008

  • Dead~born this word in Sanscrit signifies 'pregnant'.

    July 23, 2008

  • To wither.

    July 23, 2008

  • Window Persian root.

    July 23, 2008

  • War, dispute.

    July 23, 2008

  • Balcony.

    July 23, 2008

  • Appellation Sanscrit root.

    July 23, 2008

  • Coarse, rude.

    July 23, 2008

  • War, quarrel.

    July 23, 2008

Comments for missanthropist

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  • lol to palooka. epic lol

    November 10, 2009

  • 30 days in county Taciturn, that's a no~know!

    Really now, haven't you better things to do, like read crossword puzzle clues like cryptic poetry in places like smoky dim dens, to jaded audiences? I'd aDivise, no picky the scabs, and i'll naught spit fire for yer troubles ;)

    July 2, 2008

  • What sort of orthographic changes would you make to the word "sardonic"?

    May 27, 2008

  • I am leaving one - Below - as instructed - Above.

    May 27, 2008