recombinantdna has adopted , looked up 72 words, created 28 lists, listed 475 words, written 79 comments, added 332 tags, and loved 2 words.

Comments by recombinantdna

  • @sarra Hey, nice - keep 'em coming

    March 26, 2010

  • No, it's limited to awesome scientific names ;) I guess I should have clarified

    February 27, 2010

  • my hypothesis: derived from cosmology- which fits with Voltaire's use of metaphysico-theologo-cosmolonigology (see its comments).

    The -lonig- infix? I haven't found anything concrete, but I'm seeing "lone" -- ie. this best of all possible worlds being the (l)only world under study.

    February 19, 2010

  • "... a Fraulein from the Baltic provinces, who sat at an easel painting the sea and tearing her hair in despair..." -Death in Venice, Thomas Mann

    February 4, 2010

  • "Yes, personally speaking too, art heightens life. She gives deeper joy, she consumes more swiftly," -Death in Venice, Thomas Mann

    February 4, 2010

  • I enjoy that this word cropped up in both Vic's secret lipgloss, and a 3rd year physiology text book.

    October 28, 2009

  • English spelling for "Cuisle mo chroí" (COOSH la muh CREE) 'pulse of my heart', Irish term of endearment.

    October 24, 2009

  • Navocab Bokovulary?

    October 14, 2009

  • GABAergic /GABA·er·gic/ (gab″ah-er´jik) transmitting or secreting γ-aminobutyric acid.

    October 14, 2009

  • really: GABAergic, or, if I had my way, γABAergic (though caps would make it ΓABAergic, but my preference is based on prettiness, not accuracy of any sort).

    October 14, 2009

  • Backformation from proliferative?

    October 14, 2009

  • According to Prof MacKay in his lecture guide "Neurophysiology Without Tears".

    October 14, 2009

  • I'm not sure it was epenthesis -- I think it was coined from presupposition. The error was hubris.

    October 13, 2009

  • Well, don't ask her about her clitics

    October 5, 2009

  • "Although this muscle contraction happens whether or not food is present, it is more common after the animal has gone several hours without eating. This may be why a "growling" stomach is often associated with hunger." -wiki

    June 17, 2009

  • "Pangloss taught metaphysico-theologo-cosmolonigology. He proved admirably that there is no effect without a cause and that in this best of possible words, My Lord the Baron's castle was the best of all castles and his wife to best of all possible Baronesses." -- Candide, Voltaire

    April 26, 2009

  • Thanks, Mollusque. (this word is the least of my reasoning)

    Any idea if there's a common tag for unwise morphological decisions?

    April 16, 2009

  • Not quite -- from what I can gather, presuppositionalists are concerned with the Christian faith, where as presuppositionologists constitute a subset of linguists, and are concerned specifically with presuppositions.

    April 12, 2009

  • I would tag this madeupical if I hadn't encountered it in a text book. Do not presuppose that I like or respect this text book to any extent, but I have to assume some brand of editor approved its publishing.

    March 29, 2009

  • "Disabling, reversing cell cycle inhibitors - activating them and turning CIP/KIP and INKA 4a/ARFs into catalysts…" -- Walter Bishop, Fringe, "The Same Old Story"

    February 28, 2009

  • "scientific inquiry in an established field of study which departs significantly from mainstream or orthodox theories, and is classified in the "fringes" of a credible mainstream academic discipline."

    February 28, 2009

  • A highschool lab partner's misreading of "mmHg" (millimetres mercury, a measurement of pressure) -- I read it that way in my head every time, even though I was never mistaken about the correct reading.

    This isn't my standard earworm, but it qualifies in a different way, becuase it keeps coming back.

    February 22, 2009

  • A really good example from Wikipedia:

    "Swift as an arrow flying, fleeing like a hare afraid"

    adjective, simile, gerund, gerund, simile, adjective

    (A B C C B A); subtler that the other examples here, but you can see how much more powerful it is than the "parallel form" (A B C A B C):

    "Swift as an arrow flying, afraid like a hare fleeing."

    February 15, 2009

  • adj. neither flesh nor fowl

    (origin: backformation from demiscientific)

    February 15, 2009

  • coined by prof. Chiara Frigeni of U of T.

    January 12, 2009

  • see also monogenetic volcanic field

    January 3, 2009

  • "The naming of the Kiss-1 gene and its product, kisspeptin, was made by the team of scientists who discovered the gene in Hershey, Pennsylvania, famous for its chocolate "Kisses (Hershey's Kisses)" - Wiki

    December 14, 2008

  • Anne Rice

    December 11, 2008

  • Hey -- I've opened my statin list (http://wordie.org/lists/statin) so that you can add your excellent suggestions.

    December 6, 2008

  • http://xkcd.com/509/

    November 29, 2008

  • also note that when genetic tests are done on tumours, about half of them have p53 mutations (this statistic cited by the prof in a course I took in cell bio).

    November 22, 2008

  • Payne's Grey -- a personal favourite

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Payne's_grey

    November 21, 2008

  • aflatoxin > p53 mutation > (liver) cancer

    November 21, 2008

  • "a plant that has been deliberately altered or selected by humans; ... the result of artificial selection." -- wiki

    October 26, 2008

  • Bamford is a village in the Derbyshire Peak District, England, close to the River Derwent.

    October 6, 2008

  • I suspect that would be a slightly more useful lexeme. So yes.

    September 26, 2008

  • (adj.) opposite a vein

    (adj.) - vs. intravenous

    September 26, 2008

  • (and elastin? -- conflicting sources)

    September 11, 2008

  • (and elastin? -- conflicting sources)

    September 11, 2008

  • found exclusively in collagens.

    September 11, 2008

  • found exclusively in collagens.

    September 11, 2008

  • Lots of -gen words today! (Which is great, because I've been collecting them for a while)

    August 22, 2008

  • I wouldn't say that black has negative connotations here -- blackholes look black, because they pull light in.

    August 22, 2008

  • (doublepost)

    August 22, 2008

  • nothing to do with serine...?

    August 22, 2008

  • "Sometimes when you're kayaking a word gets stuck in your head, and one time banana flambé ... popped into my head. And I don't even like it. But all the way through the race it was 'banana flambé, banana flambé, banana flambé.' Thankfully, it wasn't a very important race." -- Adam van Koeverden, Olympic Gold Medalist

    August 21, 2008

  • Name of townswoman bitten by Toto in the Wizard of Oz (film, 1939).

    Has been wandering into my brain on occasion and announcing itself unexpectedly. For years. I finally googled it.

    August 8, 2008

  • nuclear fast red

    August 4, 2008

  • Kernechtrot

    August 4, 2008

  • have been listing dye names, myself -- I started with just red, & got hooked. (I include natural pigments too).

    anyway -- lifted a couple. thanks!

    -rDNA

    August 4, 2008

  • "contronympho" -- clever!

    August 4, 2008

  • awesome.

    August 4, 2008

  • Don't ask, don't tell.

    August 4, 2008

  • Hey, Valse --

    No pressure, but if you open your list to words containing 'gn' inside, you get these lovelies ... (though I don't know whether or not you can blame Old French for them)

    ignominy

    ignoble

    ignorant

    ignite

    ignition

    precognition

    cognizant

    cognomen

    -rDNA

    August 4, 2008

  • the magical time during which 'trois' is listed times is now. make a wish.

    August 4, 2008

  • "Hematein exhibits indicator-like properties, being blue and less soluble in aqueous alkaline conditions, and red and more soluble in alcoholic acidic conditions."

    -- wikipedia

    August 4, 2008

  • good list --

    My request: sects and sex. Embarrassed me in my highschool civics class.

    August 4, 2008

  • "New gynoecious hybrid cultivars produce almost all female blossoms." -- http://tinyurl.com/6syz32

    August 3, 2008

  • "A few varieties of cucumber are parthenocarpic, the blossoms creating seedless fruit without pollination." -- http://tinyurl.com/6syz32

    August 3, 2008

  • "The 'c-thru' cucumbers [have) no skin to encumber them." -- link

    August 3, 2008

  • One tough cucumber.

    August 3, 2008

  • Cool as a cucumber.

    August 3, 2008

  • proper spelling

    August 1, 2008

  • sounds made up, doesn't it.

    June 20, 2008

  • I should think the difficulty of pronouncing it such would inconvenience you more than the pain of hearing it would me.

    June 11, 2008

  • I prefer it silent. But then, I have professor-worship issues: however they say, goes.

    June 10, 2008

  • nice!

    June 7, 2008

  • Glad to be first.

    According to Wikipedia:

    "the process of blood vessel formation occurring by a de novo production of endothelial cells."

    June 7, 2008

  • As in Maude of 'Harold and Maude'.

    June 4, 2008

  • (SURF)ace (ACT)ive (A)ge(NT)

    No one seems to pronounce a /t/ at the end, leaving the ending closer to the /In/ seen in so many hormones.

    June 3, 2008

  • master of prescription, aren't we?

    June 3, 2008

  • My coinage. Thus:

    homosexual

    homeosexual

    bisexual

    heteroflexible

    heterosexual

    May 24, 2008

  • I wish I could do this.

    May 23, 2008

  • said professor says he is not aware of any such term -- you are probably safe to coin.

    May 20, 2008

  • I've contacted my Writing Systems professor with reference to this -- if he gets back to me, I'll get back to you.

    May 17, 2008

  • I love this list -- its theme

    so satisfying, as to fill the mouth to perfection

    May 11, 2008

  • It said "nobody is listing 'eu-', why don't you?"

    April 18, 2008

  • from dictionary.com:

    –noun

    1. in Medicine: healthy or adequate nutrition or development.

    2. in Ecology: the state of being eutrophic.

    (Origin: 1715–25; < Gk eutrophía. See eu-, tropho-, -y3)

    April 18, 2008

  • my hypothesis:

    eu- 'well, good'

    "noia" = nous + -ia (as in paranoia)

    where nous means 'mind, intellect'

    and -ia is a noun suffix (found in anemia and phobia)

    (all greek)

    April 16, 2008

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  • hey nice to meet you :)

    March 30, 2010