Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To fill with consternation or dismay. See Synonyms at dismay.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To depress or discourage with fear; to impress with fear in such a manner that the mind shrinks, or loses its firmness; to overcome with sudden terror or horror; to dismay; as, the sight appalled the stoutest heart.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To make pale; to blanch.
  • transitive v. To weaken; to enfeeble; to reduce.
  • transitive v. To depress or discourage with fear; to impress with fear in such a manner that the mind shrinks, or loses its firmness; to overcome with sudden terror or horror; to dismay.
  • intransitive v. To grow faint; to become weak; to become dismayed or discouraged.
  • intransitive v. To lose flavor or become stale.
  • n. Terror; dismay.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. See appal.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. fill with apprehension or alarm; cause to be unpleasantly surprised
  • v. strike with disgust or revulsion

Etymologies

Middle English apallen, to grow faint, from Old French apalir : a-, to (from Latin ad-; see ad-) + palir, to grow pale (from pale, pale, from Latin pallidus, from pallēre, to grow pale; see pel-1 in Indo-European roots).
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Old French apalir ("to grow pale, make pale"); a (Latin ad) + palir ("to grow pale, to make pale"), pâle ("pale"). See pale, a., and compare with pall. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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