Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A rough prickly husk or covering surrounding the seeds or fruits of plants such as the chestnut or the burdock.
  • n. A plant producing such husks or coverings.
  • n. A persistently clinging or nettlesome person or thing.
  • n. A rough protuberance, especially a burl on a tree.
  • n. Any of various rotary cutting tools designed to be attached to a drill.
  • n. Variant of burr2.
  • n. Variant of burr3.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A rough, prickly husk around the seeds or fruit of some plants.
  • n. Any of several plants having such husks.
  • n. A rotary cutting implement having a selection of variously shaped heads.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Any rough or prickly envelope of the seeds of plants, whether a pericarp, a persistent calyx, or an involucre, as of the chestnut and burdock; a seed vessel having hooks or prickles. Also, any weed which bears burs.
  • n. The thin ridge left by a tool in cutting or shaping metal. See Burr, n., 2.
  • n. A ring of iron on a lance or spear. See Burr, n., 4.
  • n. The lobe of the ear. See Burr, n., 5.
  • n. The sweetbread.
  • n. A clinker; a partially vitrified brick.
  • n.
  • n. A small circular saw.
  • n. A triangular chisel.
  • n. A drill with a serrated head larger than the shank; -- especially a small drill bit used by dentists.
  • n. The round knob of an antler next to a deer's head.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The rough, prickly case or covering of the seeds of certain plants, as of the chestnut and burdock.
  • n. Hence The plant burdock: as, “rude burs and thistles,”
  • n. In general, a protuberance upon, or a raised portion of, an object, usually more or less rough or irregular in form.
  • n. The name of various tools and appliances.
  • n. A partially vitrified brick; a clinker. Also called bur-brick.
  • n. The blank driven out of a piece of sheet-metal by a punch.
  • n. Waste raw silk.
  • n. A name for the club-moss, Lycopodium clavatum.
  • n. The sweetbread.
  • n. Same as burl, 2.
  • n. Same as burstone.
  • n. The rounded knob forming the base of a deer's horn.
  • n. The external meatus of the ear; the opening leading to the tympanum.
  • n. The guttural pronunciation of the rough r common in some of the northern counties of England, especially Northumberland; rhotacism.
  • n. A whirring noise. See birr, n.
  • To speak with a guttural or rough pronunciation of the letter r.
  • To talk or whisper hoarsely; murmur.
  • To make a whirring noise. See birr, verb
  • n. Same as burrow, 3.
  • n. A halo round the moon. Compare burrow, 4, brough, 4.
  • n. An abnormal outgrowth of wood, frequently of large size, occurring on the trunk or branch of a tree, usually as the result of some injury. See burl, 2.
  • To extract (burs and other extraneous matter) from (wool) by chemical or mechanical means.
  • To use a dental bur in the excavation of (a tooth-cavity).
  • n. The native Indian name for the banian-tree.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. seed vessel having hooks or prickles
  • v. remove the burrs from
  • n. small bit used in dentistry or surgery

Etymologies

Middle English burre, of Scandinavian origin.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
This definition is lacking an etymology or has an incomplete etymology. You can help Wiktionary by giving it a proper etymology. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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