Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To pass an implement through (a liquid, for example) in circular motions so as to mix or cool the contents: stirred the soup before tasting it.
  • transitive v. To introduce (an ingredient, for example) into a liquid or mixture: stirred a cup of sugar into the cake batter.
  • transitive v. To mix together the ingredients of before cooking or use: stirred up some popover batter; stirred the paint.
  • transitive v. To cause to move or shift, especially slightly or with irregular motion: A breeze stirred the branches.
  • transitive v. To prod into brisk or vigorous action; bestir: stirred themselves to fix breakfast.
  • transitive v. To rouse, as from indifference, and prompt to action. See Synonyms at provoke.
  • transitive v. To provoke deliberately: stirred by trouble.
  • transitive v. To excite strong feelings in.
  • intransitive v. To change position slightly: The dog stirred in its sleep.
  • intransitive v. To move about actively; bestir oneself.
  • intransitive v. To move away from a customary or usual place or position: instructed the guards not to stir from their posts.
  • intransitive v. To take place; happen.
  • intransitive v. To be capable of being stirred: a mixture that stirs easily.
  • intransitive v. To be roused or affected by strong feelings: "His wrath so stirred within him, that he could have struck him dead” ( Charles Dickens).
  • n. A stirring, mixing, or poking movement.
  • n. A slight movement.
  • n. A disturbance or commotion.
  • n. An excited reaction; a ferment.
  • n. Slang Prison.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To change the place of in any manner; to move.
  • v. To disturb the relative position of the particles of, as of a liquid, by passing something through it; to agitate.
  • v. To agitate the content of (a container) by passing something through it.
  • v. To bring into debate; to agitate; to moot.
  • v. To incite to action; to arouse; to instigate; to prompt; to excite.
  • v. To move; to change one’s position.
  • v. To be in motion; to be active or bustling; to exert or busy one's self.
  • v. To become the object of notice; to be on foot.
  • n. The act or result of stirring; agitation; tumult; bustle; noise or various movements.
  • n. Public disturbance or commotion; tumultuous disorder; seditious uproar.
  • n. Agitation of thoughts; conflicting passions.
  • n. Jail; prison.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To change the place of in any manner; to move.
  • transitive v. To disturb the relative position of the particles of, as of a liquid, by passing something through it; to agitate.
  • transitive v. To bring into debate; to agitate; to moot.
  • transitive v. To incite to action; to arouse; to instigate; to prompt; to excite.
  • intransitive v. To move; to change one's position.
  • intransitive v. To be in motion; to be active or bustling; to exert or busy one's self.
  • intransitive v. To become the object of notice; to be on foot.
  • intransitive v. To rise, or be up, in the morning.
  • n. The act or result of stirring; agitation; tumult; bustle; noise or various movements.
  • n. Public disturbance or commotion; tumultuous disorder; seditious uproar.
  • n. Agitation of thoughts; conflicting passions.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To move; change the position or situation of: as, to stir hand or foot.
  • To set in motion; agitate; disturb.
  • To move briskly; bestir.
  • To cause the particles or parts of to change place in relation to each other by agitating with the hand or an implement: as, to stir the fire with a poker; to stir one's coffee with a spoon.
  • To brandish; flourish.
  • To bring into notice or discussion; agitate; debate; moot.
  • To rouse, as from sleep or inaction; awaken.
  • To move; excite; rouse.
  • To incite; instigate; set on.
  • To excite; provoke; foment; bring about: as, to stir up a mutiny; to stir up contention.
  • To rouse to action; stimulate; quicken: as, to stir up the mind.
  • To pass from rest or inaction to motion or action; move; budge: as, they dare not stir; to stir abroad.
  • To be in motion; be in a state of activity; be on the move or go; be active: as, to be continually stirring.
  • To be in circulation; be current; be on foot.
  • To use an instrument or the hand for making a disturbing or agitating motion, as in a liquid.
  • To be roused; be excited; disturb or agitate one's self.
  • n. Movement; action.
  • n. A state of motion, activity, briskness, bustle, or the like; the confusion and tumult of many persons in action.
  • n. Commotion; excitement; tumult: as, his appearance on the scene created quite a stir.
  • n. Motion; impulse; emotion; feeling.
  • n. A poke; a jog.
  • n. A house of correction; a lockup; a prison.
  • n. Sir.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a prominent or sensational but short-lived news event
  • v. move very slightly
  • v. stir the feelings, emotions, or peace of
  • n. a rapid active commotion
  • v. to begin moving,
  • v. affect emotionally
  • v. mix or add by stirring
  • n. emotional agitation and excitement
  • v. move an implement through
  • v. stir feelings in
  • v. summon into action or bring into existence, often as if by magic

Etymologies

Middle English stiren, from Old English styrian, to excite, agitate.
Origin unknown.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Old English styrian (Wiktionary)
This definition is lacking an etymology or has an incomplete etymology. You can help Wiktionary by giving it a proper etymology. (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

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  • In stir it is, sir.

    June 21, 2008

  • I thought it was just in stir.

    June 21, 2008

  • But wait -- being in the stir is to be in prison, no?

    June 21, 2008

  • Slang for prison, hence stir crazy

    June 20, 2008

  • Stir in the sense of moving around vs. being locked up.

    June 20, 2008