Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To call together for a common purpose; assemble: rally troops at a parade ground.
  • transitive v. To reassemble and restore to order: rally scattered forces.
  • transitive v. To rouse or revive from inactivity or decline: paused to refresh themselves and rally their strength.
  • intransitive v. To come together for a common purpose.
  • intransitive v. To join in an effort for a common cause: "In the terror and confusion of change, society rallied round the kings” ( Garrett Mattingly).
  • intransitive v. To recover abruptly from a setback or disadvantage: The stock market declined, then rallied. The home team rallied in the ninth inning to win the game.
  • intransitive v. To show sudden improvement in health or spirits.
  • intransitive v. Sports To exchange several strokes before a point is won, as in tennis.
  • n. A gathering, especially one intended to inspire enthusiasm for a cause: a political rally.
  • n. A reassembling, as of dispersed troops.
  • n. The signal ordering this reassembly.
  • n. An abrupt recovery from a setback or disadvantage.
  • n. A sharp improvement in health, vigor, or spirits.
  • n. A notable rise in stock market prices and trading volume after a decline.
  • n. Sports An exchange of strokes in a court game such as tennis or volleyball, ending when one side fails to make a good return and resulting in a point or the loss of service.
  • n. Sports A competition in which automobiles are driven over public roads and under normal traffic regulations but with specified rules as to speed, time, and route.
  • transitive v. To tease good-humoredly; banter.
  • intransitive v. To engage in good-humored teasing or jesting.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A demonstration; an event where people gather together to protest for or against a given cause
  • n. , table tennis, tennis, badminton) A sequence of strokes between serving and scoring a point.
  • n. An event in which competitors drive through a series of timed special stages at intervals. The winner is the driver who completes all stages with the shortest cumulative time.
  • n. A recovery after a decline in prices; -- said of the market, stocks, etc.
  • v. To collect, and reduce to order, as troops dispersed or thrown into confusion; to gather again; to reunite.
  • v. To come into orderly arrangement; to renew order, or united effort, as troops scattered or put to flight; to assemble; to unite.
  • v. To collect one's vital powers or forces; to regain health or consciousness; to recuperate.
  • v. To recover strength after a decline in prices; -- said of the market, stocks, etc.
  • v. To tease; to chaff good-humouredly.
  • n. Good-humoured raillery.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To collect, and reduce to order, as troops dispersed or thrown into confusion; to gather again; to reunite.
  • intransitive v. To come into orderly arrangement; to renew order, or united effort, as troops scattered or put to flight; to assemble; to unite.
  • intransitive v. To collect one's vital powers or forces; to regain health or consciousness; to recuperate.
  • intransitive v. To recover strength after a decline in prices; -- said of the market, stocks, etc.
  • n. The act or process of rallying (in any of the senses of that word).
  • n. A political mass meeting.
  • transitive v. To attack with raillery, either in good humor and pleasantry, or with slight contempt or satire.
  • intransitive v. To use pleasantry, or satirical merriment.
  • n. Good-humored raillery.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To bring together or into order again by urgent effort; urge or bring to reunion for joint action; hence, to draw or call together in general for a common purpose: as, to rally a disorganized army; to rally voters to the polls.
  • To call up or together, unite, draw, gather up, concentrate, etc., energetically.
  • To come together or into order again with haste or ardor; reunite energetically; hence, to gather or become conjoined for a common and; cohere for aid or support.
  • To come into renewed energy or action; acquire new or renewed strength or vigor; undergo restoration or recovery, either partial or complete: as, the market rallied from its depression; the patient rallied about midnight.
  • n. A rapid or ardent reunion for effort of any kind; a renewal of energy in joint action; a quick recovery from disorder or dispersion, as of a body of troops or other persons.
  • n. Theat., specifically, the general scramble or chase of all the players in a pantomime; a mêlée of pantomimists, as at the end of a transformation scene.
  • n. In lawn-tennis, the return of the ball over the net from one side to the other for a number of times consecutively.
  • n. A quick recovery from a state of depression or exhaustion; renewal of energy or of vigorous action; return to or toward the prior or normal condition, as in disease, trade, active exertion of any kind, etc.: as, a rally in the course of a disease; a rally in prices.
  • To attack with raillery; treat with jocose, satirical, or sarcastic pleasantry; make merry with in regard to something; poke fun at; quiz.
  • Synonyms Banter, etc. (see banter), joke, quiz, tease.
  • To use pleasantry or satirical merriment.
  • n. An exercise of good humor or satirical merriment.
  • In boxing, to attack vigorously.
  • In sporting, to parry.
  • n. In electioneering, a mass-meeting of a political party: as, a Republican rally was held in the town hall.
  • n. The military signal for rallying: as, to sound the rally.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a marked recovery of strength or spirits during an illness
  • v. gather or bring together
  • v. return to a former condition
  • v. harass with persistent criticism or carping
  • n. a large gathering of people intended to arouse enthusiasm
  • n. the feat of mustering strength for a renewed effort
  • v. call to arms; of military personnel
  • n. an automobile race run over public roads
  • n. (sports) an unbroken sequence of several successive strokes
  • v. gather

Etymologies

French rallier, from Old French ralier : re-, re- + alier, to unite, ally; see ally.
French railler, from Old French, to tease; see rail3.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Old French ralier (French rallier), from Latin prefix re- + ad + ligare ("to bind; to ally"). (Wiktionary)
French railler. See rail ("to scoff"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

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  • "Clear therefore thy Head, and Rally and Manage thy Thoughts Rightly, and thou wilt Save Time, and See and Do thy Business Well; for thy Judgment will be Distinct, thy Mind Free, and the Faculties Strong and Regular."
    - William Penn, 'Fruits of Solitude'.

    September 8, 2009