Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To bring back to life or consciousness; resuscitate.
  • transitive v. To impart new health, vigor, or spirit to.
  • transitive v. To restore to use, currency, activity, or notice.
  • transitive v. To restore the validity or effectiveness of.
  • transitive v. To renew in the mind; recall.
  • transitive v. To present (an old play, for example) again.
  • intransitive v. To return to life or consciousness.
  • intransitive v. To regain health, vigor, or good spirits.
  • intransitive v. To return to use, currency, or notice.
  • intransitive v. To return to validity, effectiveness, or operative condition.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To return to life; to recover life or strength; to live anew; to become reanimated or reinvigorated.
  • v. To recover from a state of oblivion, obscurity, neglect, or depression; as, classical learning revived in the fifteenth century.
  • v. To restore, or bring again to life; to reanimate.
  • v. To raise from coma, languor, depression, or discouragement; to bring into action after a suspension.
  • v. Hence, to recover from a state of neglect or disuse; as, to revive letters or learning.
  • v. To renew in the mind or memory; to bring to recollection; to recall attention to; to reawaken.
  • v. To recover its natural or metallic state, as a metal.
  • v. To restore or reduce to its natural or metallic state

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • intransitive v. To return to life; to recover life or strength; to live anew; to become reanimated or reinvigorated.
  • intransitive v. Hence, to recover from a state of oblivion, obscurity, neglect, or depression.
  • intransitive v. To recover its natural or metallic state, as a metal.
  • transitive v. To restore, or bring again to life; to reanimate.
  • transitive v. To raise from coma, languor, depression, or discouragement; to bring into action after a suspension.
  • transitive v. Hence, to recover from a state of neglect or disuse.
  • transitive v. To renew in the mind or memory; to bring to recollection; to recall attention to; to reawaken.
  • transitive v. To restore or reduce to its natural or metallic state.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To return to life after actual or seeming death; resume vital functions or activities: as, to revive after a swoon.
  • To live again; have a second life.
  • To gain fresh life and vigor; be reanimated or quickened; recover strength, as after languor or depression.
  • To be renewed in the mind or memory: as, the memory of his wrongs revived within him; past emotions sometimes revive.
  • To regain use or currency; come into general use, practice, or acceptance, as after a period of neglect or disuse; become current once more.
  • In chem., to recover its natural or metallic state, as a metal.
  • To bring back to life; revivify; resuscitate after actual or seeming death or destruction; restore to a previous mode of existence.
  • To quicken; refresh; rouse from languor, depression, or discouragement.
  • To renew in the mind or memory; recall; reawaken.
  • To restore to use, practice, or general acceptance; make current, popular, or authoritative once more; recover from neglect or disuse: as, to revive a law or a custom.
  • To renovate.
  • To reproduce; represent after a lapse of time, especially upon the stage: as, to revive an old play.
  • In law, to reinstate, as an action or suit which has become abated. See revival
  • In chem., to restore or reduce to its natural state or to its metallic state: as, to revive a metal after calcination.
  • In physical geography, to rejuvenate; give renewed erosive action to by regional uplift: said of streams and rivers.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. give new life or energy to
  • v. be brought back to life, consciousness, or strength
  • v. cause to regain consciousness
  • v. return to consciousness
  • v. restore from a depressed, inactive, or unused state

Etymologies

Middle English reviven, from Old French revivre, from Latin revīvere, to live again : re-, re- + vīvere, to live; see gwei- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle French revivre, Latin revivere; prefix re- re- + vivere to live. See vivid. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • The “further the world gets from the gulf war, the more it seems willing to let Mr. Hussein revive his deadly weapons projects.”

    Think Progress » The Intelligence Agencies Didn’t Get It Wrong, The Bush Administration Did

  • This further is to be observed, concerning ideas lodged in the memory, and upon occasion revived by the mind, that they are not only (as the word revive imports) none of them new ones, but also that the mind takes notice of them as of a former impression, and renews its acquaintance with them, as with ideas it had known before.

    God, Aids & Circumcision

  • We are now having our winter snow, not indeed deep or heavy, or long lying, but more than we have had yet this season, and ice and frost that again revive my hope of getting the ice-house filled before the spring fairly comes, and we are left unprovided with what is here such an indispensable necessary of life, that we shall have to purchase it daily, if we have not our stored supply.

    Further Records, 1848-1883: A Series of Letters

  • Now, hanging a few traitors will not kill slavery; and our danger is that slavery itself will slip through the noose, and that when it shall begin to revive from the shock, many who are now shouting "Hang the traitors," will take up the old familiar cry, "Hang the abolitionists."

    Abraham Lincoln; His Life and Its Lessons

  • It was some time since Jerry had spoken a word of German, but as she stood before Gretchen's picture old memories seemed to revive, and with them the German word for _pretty_, which she involuntarily spoke aloud.

    Tracy Park

  • Could textspeak in Irish revive interest in the language?

    RTÉ News

  • Gill Scott, the Great North Museum's Egyptology expert, explained to me that both acts "mean that nobody can say her name and revive her spirit in the after-world", and both acts must have been done by somebody closely involved in the mummification process.

    British Museum handsomely fulfils its duties to England outside London

  • On looking over the list of Wilmingtons 'personages who have been instrumental in moulding its character and making it one of the most desirable places on earth, and the memory of whose face and name revive the sweetest recollections of early youth in the dear old town, the name and face of Uncle Guy comes most vividly before me.

    Hanover; or, The Persecution of the Lowly. Story of the Wilmington Massacre

  • LONDON Reuters - Large European private equity buyouts are on hold until capital markets revive, which is unlikely to happen this side of Christmas as leveraged loan and high-yield bond markets remain weak, bankers said on Thursday.

    Reuters: Press Release

  • A nasal cannula connects you up to four bottles labelled 'revive', 'head repair', 'blast' and 'detox'.

    The Independent - Frontpage RSS Feed

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