Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • intransitive v. To be cooked gently or remain just at or below the boiling point.
  • intransitive v. To be filled with pent-up emotion; seethe.
  • intransitive v. To be in a state of gentle ferment: thoughts simmering in the back of her mind.
  • transitive v. To cook (food) gently in a liquid just at or below the boiling point.
  • transitive v. To keep (a liquid) near or just below the boiling point. See Synonyms at boil1.
  • n. The state or process of simmering.
  • simmer down To become calm after excitement or anger.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The state or process of simmering.
  • v. To cook or undergo heating slowly at or below the boiling point.
  • v. To cause to cook or to cause to undergo heating slowly at or below the boiling point.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • intransitive v. To boil gently, or with a gentle hissing; to begin to boil.
  • transitive v. To cause to boil gently; to cook in liquid heated almost or just to the boiling point.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To make a gentle murmuring or hissing sound, under the action of heat, as liquids when beginning to boil; hence, to become heated gradually: said especially of liquids which are to be kept, while heating, just below the boiling-point.
  • Figuratively, to be on the point of boiling or breaking forth, as suppressed anger.
  • To cause to simmer; heat gradually: said especially of liquids kept just below the boiling-point.
  • n. A gentle, gradual, uniform heating: said especially of liquids.
  • n. A Scotch form of summer.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. boil slowly at low temperature
  • n. temperature just below the boiling point

Etymologies

Alteration of Middle English simpire, to simmer, probably of imitative origin.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

Comments

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  • Scots - summer.

    As on the banks o' wandering Nith,
    Ae smiling simmer morn I stray'd,
    And traced its bonie howes and haughs,
    Where linties sang and lammies play'd,
    I sat me down upon a craig,
    And drank my fill o' fancy's dream,
    When from the eddying deep below,
    Up rose the genius of the stream.

    - Robert Burns, 'Verses On The Destruction Of The Woods Near Drumlanrig'.

    January 28, 2009