Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To protect from loss or harm; preserve: calls to conserve our national heritage in the face of bewildering change.
  • transitive v. To use carefully or sparingly, avoiding waste: kept the thermostat lower to conserve energy.
  • transitive v. To keep (a quantity) constant through physical or chemical reactions or evolutionary changes.
  • transitive v. To preserve (fruits) with sugar.
  • intransitive v. To economize: tried to conserve on fuel during the long winter.
  • n. A jam made of fruits stewed in sugar.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Wilderness where human development is prohibited.
  • n. A jam or thick syrup made from fruit.
  • n. A medicinal confection made of freshly gathered vegetable substances mixed with finely powdered refined sugar.
  • n. A conservatory.
  • v. To save for later use.
  • v. To protect an environment.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To keep in a safe or sound state; to save; to preserve; to protect.
  • transitive v. To prepare with sugar, etc., for the purpose of preservation, as fruits, etc.; to make a conserve of.
  • n. Anything which is conserved; especially, a sweetmeat prepared with sugar; a confection.
  • n. A medicinal confection made of freshly gathered vegetable substances mixed with finely powdered refined sugar. See Confection.
  • n. A conservatory.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To keep in a safe or sound state; save; preserve from loss, decay, waste, or injury; defend from violation: as, to conserve bodies from perishing; to conserve the peace of society.
  • To preserve with sugar, etc., as fruits, roots, herbs, etc.; prepare or make up as a sweetmeat.
  • n. That which is conserved; a sweetmeat; a confection; especially, in former use, a pharmaceutical confection.
  • n. . A conservatory.
  • n. Aconserver; that which conserves.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. fruit preserved by cooking with sugar
  • v. preserve with sugar
  • v. keep constant through physical or chemical reactions or evolutionary change
  • v. use cautiously and frugally
  • v. keep in safety and protect from harm, decay, loss, or destruction

Etymologies

Middle English conserven, from Old French conserver, from Latin cōnservāre : com-, intensive pref.; see com- + servāre, to preserve; see ser-1 in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Old French conserver, from Latin conservare ("to keep, preserve"), from com- (intensive prefix) + servo ("keep watch, maintain"). See also observe. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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