Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. An artisan who fashions objects of gold.
  • n. A trader or dealer in gold articles.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A person who forges things out of gold, especially jewelry.
  • n. A banker (because the goldsmiths of London used to receive money on deposit, being equipped to keep it safely).

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. An artisan who manufactures vessels and ornaments, etc., of gold.
  • n. A banker.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. An artisan who manufactures vessels and ornaments of gold; a worker in gold.
  • n. In entomology, a goldsmith-beetle.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. an artisan who makes jewelry and other objects out of gold
  • n. Irish writer of novels and poetry and plays and essays (1728-1774)

Etymologies

gold +‎ smith (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • So she equipped herself and setting out, traversed the wastes and spent treasures till she came to Sistan, where she called a goldsmith to make her somewhat of ornaments.

    Arabian nights. English

  • The goldsmith was a rude, peppery fellow, who did not mince his words.

    Mistress Wilding

  • The name of Leone Leoni is otherwise known as a goldsmith and bronze-caster.

    CXXV

  • But, as already stated, the goldsmith was a village menial in the Maratha villages, and Sir D. Ibbetson thinks that the Jat really considers the Sunar to be distinctly inferior to himself.

    The Tribes and Castes of the Central Provinces of India - Volume IV of IV Kumhar-Yemkala

  • Teenage 'goldsmith' gets two years for stealing jewellery - Magistrate Fazil Azeez yesterday sentenced a teenage "goldsmith" who admitted that he conned persons

    Stabroek News

  • Indeed he may be said never to have relinquished his connection with the trade, and certainly he was no more ashamed of it than of his calling as a painter, for he signed himself indiscriminately 'goldsmith' and 'painter,' and sometimes whimsically put 'goldsmith' to his paintings and 'painter' to his jewellery.

    The Old Masters and Their Pictures For the Use of Schools and Learners in Art

  • "goldsmith" — it was there, no doubt, that he learned the art of printing books.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 14: Simony-Tournon

  • MD says: tangential to what the commenters seem to be interested in, but harvard law tends to be happy with professors who go back and forth between washington and cambridge (e.g. charles fried, stephen breyer) and elena kagan seemed to keep that tradition in her hiring (e.g. jack goldsmith, jody freeman). it seems the lesson is not only about people being better at one job than another, but better in one place than another.

    The Volokh Conspiracy » Kagan “Not a Natural Academic”

  • If the printed word were the guardian of all democratic values, how is it that the country where, in 1439, a goldsmith named Johannes Gutenberg invented the movable type printing press succumbed almost 500 years later to a totalitarian hell, in which books, and the knowledge in them, were suppressed with a relatively small number of bonfires?

    Jonathan Franzen is wrong: the digital age is making us smarter | Henry Porter

  • Jacqueline Kathleen Mina, goldsmith and jeweller, for serv art.

    New Year honours: the full list

Comments

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  • Irish Poets: Oliver Goldsmith

    Goldsmith wrote Deserted Village,
    Now again reduced to tillage;
    Once happiest village of the plain,
    Place now you look for it in vain;
    There but one man he doth make rich,
    And hundreds struggle in the ditch;

    "I'll fare (sic) the land to many ills a prey
    Where wealth accumelates (sic) but men decay."
    His honest Vicar of Wakefield
    Forever he will pleasure yield.

    James McIntyre.

    June 6, 2009