Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To fasten from above with no support from below; suspend.
  • transitive v. To suspend or fasten so as to allow free movement at or about the point of suspension: hang a door.
  • transitive v. To execute by suspending by the neck: They hanged the prisoner at dawn.
  • transitive v. Used to express exasperation or disgust: I'll be hanged! Hang it all!
  • transitive v. To fix or attach at an appropriate angle: hang a scythe to its handle.
  • transitive v. To alter the hem of (a garment) so as to fall evenly at a specified height.
  • transitive v. To furnish, decorate, or appoint by suspending objects around or about: hang a room with curtains.
  • transitive v. To hold or incline downward; let droop: hang one's head in sorrow.
  • transitive v. Informal To make (a turn in a specific direction): At the next intersection, hang a right.
  • transitive v. To attach to a wall: hang wallpaper.
  • transitive v. To display, as in a gallery or office: hung four new paintings in the foyer.
  • transitive v. Informal To give (a nickname or label) to someone.
  • transitive v. To deadlock (a jury) by failing to render a unanimous verdict.
  • transitive v. Baseball To throw (a pitch) in such a manner as to fail to break.
  • transitive v. Computer Science To cause (a computer system) to halt so that input devices, such as the keyboard or the mouse, do not function.
  • intransitive v. To be attached from above with no support from below.
  • intransitive v. To die as a result of hanging.
  • intransitive v. To remain suspended or poised over a place or an object; hover: rain clouds hanging low over the corn fields.
  • intransitive v. To attach oneself as a dependent or an impediment; cling.
  • intransitive v. To incline downward; droop.
  • intransitive v. To depend: Everything hangs on the committee's decision.
  • intransitive v. To pay strict attention: a student who hangs on the professor's every word.
  • intransitive v. To remain unresolved or uncertain: His future hung in the balance.
  • intransitive v. To fit the body in loose lines: a dress that hangs well.
  • intransitive v. To be on display, as in a gallery.
  • intransitive v. Baseball To fail to break or move in the intended way, as a curve ball.
  • intransitive v. To be imminent; loom: the threat hanging over us.
  • intransitive v. To be or become burdensome. Time hung heavy on my hands.
  • intransitive v. Computer Science To be halted, as a computer system, so that input devices do not function: The power surge caused my computer to hang, so I had to reboot it.
  • intransitive v. Slang To spend one's free time in a certain place. Often used with around or out: liked to hang out at the pool hall.
  • intransitive v. Slang To pass time idly; loiter. Often used with around or out: spent the evening hanging at home; hung out for an hour before going to the play.
  • intransitive v. Slang To keep company; see socially. Often used with around or out: hangs around with kids from a different school.
  • n. The way in which something hangs.
  • n. A downward inclination or slope.
  • n. Particular meaning or significance.
  • n. Informal The proper method for doing, using, or handling something: finally got the hang of it.
  • n. A suspension of motion; a slackening.
  • hang back To be averse; hold back.
  • hang in Informal To persevere: decided to hang in despite his illness.
  • hang off To hold back; be averse.
  • hang on To cling tightly to something.
  • hang on To continue persistently; persevere.
  • hang on To keep a telephone connection open.
  • hang on To wait for a short period of time.
  • hang together To stand united; stick together: "We must all hang together, or assuredly we shall all hang separately” ( Benjamin Franklin).
  • hang together To constitute a coherent totality: diverse plot lines that did not hang together.
  • hang up To suspend on a hook or hanger.
  • hang up To replace (a telephone receiver) on its base or cradle.
  • hang up To end a telephone conversation.
  • hang up To delay or impede; hinder: Budget problems hung up the project for months.
  • hang up To become halted or snagged: The fishing line hung up on a rock.
  • hang up Informal To have or cause to have emotional difficulties or inhibitions.
  • idiom give To be concerned or anxious: I don't give a hang what you do.
  • idiom hang fire To delay: "They are people who hung fire even through the bloody days of the Hungarian Revolution” ( Mark Muro).
  • idiom hang fire To be slow in firing, as a gun.
  • idiom hang in there Informal To persevere despite difficulties; persist: She hung in there despite pressure to resign.
  • idiom hang it up Informal To give up; quit.
  • idiom hang loose Slang To stay calm or relaxed.
  • idiom hang (one's) hat To settle oneself; take up residence: hung my hat in Chicago.
  • idiom hang on to To hold firmly; keep fast: Hang on to your money.
  • idiom hang tough Informal To remain firmly resolved: "We are going to hang tough on this” ( Donald T. Regan).
  • idiom let it all hang out Slang To be completely relaxed.
  • idiom let it all hang out Slang To be completely candid.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Cheap, processed ham (cured pork), often made specially for sandwiches.
  • v. To be or remain suspended.
  • v. To float, as if suspended.
  • v. To hold or bear in a suspended or inclined manner or position instead of erect.
  • v. To cause (something) to be suspended, as from a hook, hanger, or the like.
  • v. To execute (someone) by suspension from the neck.
  • v. To be executed by suspension by one's neck from a gallows, a tree, or other raised bar, attached by a rope tied into a noose.
  • v. To loiter, hang around, to spend time idly.
  • v. To exhibit (an object).
  • v. To apply (wallpaper or drywall to a wall).
  • v. To decorate (something) with hanging objects.
  • v. To stop responding to manual input devices such as keyboard or mouse.
  • v. To cause (a program or computer) to stop responding.
  • v. To cause (a piece) to become vulnerable to capture.
  • v. To be vulnerable to capture.
  • n. The way in which something hangs.
  • n. A grip, understanding
  • n. An instance of ceasing to respond to input devices.
  • n. An idiophone somewhat similar to a steelpan

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To suspend; to fasten to some elevated point without support from below; -- often used with up or out
  • transitive v. To fasten in a manner which will allow of free motion upon the point or points of suspension; -- said of a pendulum, a swing, a door, gate, etc.
  • transitive v. To fit properly, as at a proper angle (a part of an implement that is swung in using), as a scythe to its snath, or an ax to its helve.
  • transitive v. To put to death by suspending by the neck; -- a form of capital punishment.
  • transitive v. To cover, decorate, or furnish by hanging pictures, trophies, drapery, and the like, or by covering with paper hangings; -- said of a wall, a room, etc.
  • transitive v. To paste, as paper hangings, on the walls of a room.
  • transitive v. To hold or bear in a suspended or inclined manner or position instead of erect; to droop.
  • transitive v. To prevent from reaching a decision, esp. by refusing to join in a verdict that must be unanimous.
  • intransitive v. To be suspended or fastened to some elevated point without support from below; to dangle; to float; to rest; to remain; to stay.
  • intransitive v. To be fastened in such a manner as to allow of free motion on the point or points of suspension.
  • intransitive v. To die or be put to death by suspension from the neck.
  • intransitive v. To hold for support; to depend; to cling; -- usually with on or upon.
  • intransitive v. To be, or be like, a suspended weight.
  • intransitive v. To hover; to impend; to appear threateningly; -- usually with over.
  • intransitive v. To lean or incline; to incline downward.
  • intransitive v. To slope down.
  • intransitive v. To be undetermined or uncertain; to be in suspense; to linger; to be delayed.
  • intransitive v. Of a ball: To rebound unexpectedly or unusually slowly, due to backward spin on the ball or imperfections of ground.
  • intransitive v. to fail to curve, break, or drop as intended; -- said of pitches, such as curve balls or sliders.
  • intransitive v. to cease to operate normally and remain suspended in some state without performing useful work; -- said of computer programs, computers, or individual processes within a program.
  • n. The manner in which one part or thing hangs upon, or is connected with, another.
  • n. Connection; arrangement; plan.
  • n. A sharp or steep declivity or slope.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To fasten or attach so as to be supported from above and not from below; suspend.
  • To suspend by the neck or by the limbs to a gibbet or cross: a mode of capital punishment.
  • To suspend in such a manner as to allow of free motion on the point or points of suspension: said of a door, a gate, a window-blind, and the like.
  • To cover, furnish, or decorate by anything suspended or attached: followed by with before the object suspended or attached: as, to hang a room with paper or lincrusta.
  • To bend or turn downward; hold in a drooping attitude: as, to hang the head.
  • To hold in a state of suspense or inaction; stop the movement or action of: as, to hang a jury. See phrase below.
  • To fasten the blade of to the handle at an angle: said of a scythe, a hoe, etc.
  • To get fast; catch.
  • To suspend in the open air, as washed clothes, to dry.
  • To hold in suspense; keep or suffer to remain undecided: as, to hang up a question in debate.
  • To be suspended; be supported or held in place, wholly or partly, by something above, as a curtain, or at one side, as a door; dangle; depend; droop: as, the door hangs badly; the folds of her shawl hung gracefully.
  • To be suspended by the neck; suffer death by hanging.
  • To bend forward or downward; lean or incline.
  • Hence To depend; be dependent upon or be supported by something else: with on or by: as, his life hangs on the judge's decision.
  • To hold fast; cling; adhere.
  • To hover; impend; be imminent.
  • To be in suspense; rest uncertainly; vacillate; waver; hesitate; falter: as, to hang between two opinions; to hang in doubt, or in the balance. See phrases below.
  • To be held in suspense; suffer check or delay.
  • To linger; loiter.
  • To slope; have a steep declivity; as, hanging grounds.
  • To come to a standstill; fail to agree: as, the jury hung, and the man got a new trial. Bartlett, Americanisms.
  • To balance: as, the gun hangs well.
  • An inverted or suspended fire-bridge in a steam-boiler furnace. It is sometimes hollow and connected with the water-space of the boiler.
  • Nautical, to be in a neglected or dilapidated condition, as a vessel whose rigging is uncared for, whose rope-ends are frayed, and on which everything is untidy.
  • To refuse or delay compliance; hang back; hold off.
  • To weigh upon; oppress.
  • To depend or rest upon; rely upon.
  • To regard with close attention or passionate admiration.
  • II. [On, adv.] To persist; be importunate; continue tediously: as, office-seekers hang on to the last; the lawsuit still hangs on.
  • Nautical, to hold fast without belaying.
  • To be consistent in details; agree in all parts: as, the story does not hang together.
  • n. A slope or declivity; degree of slope or inclination: as, the hang of a roof or a terrace.
  • n. The way in which a thing hangs: as, the hang of a skirt or of a curtain.
  • n. In ship-building, the curvature of a plank concave on its lower edge when bent to the frame of a ship. If the curve is convex on the lower edge, it is called sny.
  • n. Nautical, same as rake.
  • n. A clump of weeds hanging together.
  • n. A crop of fruit.
  • n. General bent or tendency: as, the hang of a discourse.
  • n. The mode in which one thing is connected with another, or in which one part of a thing is connected with another part: as, the hang of a scythe.
  • n. The precise manner of doing or using something: as, to get the hang of a new implement; to lose the hang of it.
  • In cricket, to comefrom the pitch at a perceptibly decreased rate of speed: said of a ball bowled.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. kill by hanging
  • v. suspend (meat) in order to get a gamey taste
  • v. let drop or droop
  • v. prevent from reaching a verdict, of a jury
  • v. be placed in position as by a hinge
  • v. hold on tightly or tenaciously
  • v. be suspended or poised
  • v. be suspended or hanging
  • n. a gymnastic exercise performed on the rings or horizontal bar or parallel bars when the gymnast's weight is supported by the arms
  • n. a special way of doing something
  • v. decorate or furnish with something suspended
  • v. fall or flow in a certain way
  • v. place in position as by a hinge so as to allow free movement in one direction
  • v. be menacing, burdensome, or oppressive
  • v. give heed (to)
  • v. cause to be hanging or suspended
  • v. be exhibited
  • n. the way a garment hangs

Etymologies

Middle English hongen, from Old English hangian, to be suspended, and from hōn, to hang.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From hang sangwich, Irish colloquial pronunciation of ham sandwich. (Wiktionary)
A fusion of Old English hōn ("to hang, be hanging") [intrans.] and hangian ("to hang, cause to hang") [trans.]; also probably influenced by Old Norse hengja ("suspend") and hanga ("be suspended"); all from Proto-Germanic *hanhanan, from Proto-Indo-European *keng- (“to waver, be in suspense”) (compare Gothic 𐌷𐌰𐌷𐌰𐌽 (hāhan), Hittite gang- ("to hang"), Sanskrit sankate ("wavers"), Latin cunctari ("to delay")) and Albanian çengë ("a hook"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • "No, papa; not hang them -- but _hang on_ to them!"

    The Lincoln Story Book

  • Elaina let the word hang there without adding the rest.

    Unspeakable

  • He let the word hang in the air for a moment, waiting for the dead flesh and old hides to cover it and give it form.

    The Whisperers

  • “The aim of philosophy,” he wrote, “is to understand how things in the broadest possible sense of the term hang together in the broadest possible sense of the term” (PSIM, 37).

    Wilfrid Sellars

  • If philosophy is the attempt “to understand how things in the broadest possible sense of the term hang together in the broadest possible sense of the term”, as Sellars (1962) put it, philosophy should not ignore technology.

    Philosophy of Technology

  • It is hard to under-emphasize how deeply this picture of how we come to understand the world has rooted itself in European and North American culture and it has encouraged us all, since birth, to think almost exclusively that the appropriate way to proceed in all human endeavours is to "understand how things in the broadest possible sense of the term hang together in the broadest possible sense of the term" (ibid p. 235).

    UUpdates - All updates

  • “Jilly’s got a tat,” Jamal said, letting the word hang in the air.

    Foul Lines

  • “Let’s see … she’d have curly hair, a sweet smile, and …” He let the word hang there for the longest time, then finished. “… she wouldn’t be too short.”

    Surrender A Dream

  • A couple of small blue and yellow Swedish flags hang from the wooden fences by the groundfloor flats while a lone child is playing at the swings in the playground.

    Sweden: Malmö's immigrants adjust to life in gunman's sights

  • Activists go there to read or buy movement literature; buy paraphenalia such as stickers, masks and spray paint; attend meetings, lectures or films; or just plain hang out.

    Silent Signals, Bryan Caplan | EconLog | Library of Economics and Liberty

Comments

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  • hang of it

    September 8, 2010

  • She's got the hang of it, for instance

    November 17, 2008

  • In chess, giving up a piece for nothing.

    February 21, 2007