Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Incipient; beginning.
  • adj. Grammar Inchoative.
  • n. Grammar An inchoative verb.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. beginning; of or relating to inception
  • adj. aspectually inflected to show that the action is beginning

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Beginning; expressing or indicating beginning; ; -- called also inchoative.
  • n. An inceptive word, phrase, or clause.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Beginning; starting; noting the initial point or step: as, an inceptive proposition; an inceptive verb (one that expresses the beginning of action).
  • In mathematics, serving to initiate or produce: applied to such moments or first principles as, though of no magnitude themselves, are yet capable of producing results which are: thus, a point is inceptive of a line; a line, of a surface; and a surface, of a solid.
  • n. That which begins or notes beginning, as a proposition or a verb. Also inchoative.

Etymologies

From the French inceptif, from the Latin inceptīvus, from incipiō ("I begin"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Because I spent a good two minutes weighing the pros and cons of each, I now realize that I was wholly taken advantage of by inceptive in the Christopher Nolan sense of the word marketing.

    Danny Licht: Woes of a Consumer: Toothpaste Fragmentation

  • Little did I know that my Brooklyn born and bred future wife was also witnessing, 50 miles to the west of me, this inceptive conflagration paired to Christmas music.

    TV Yule Log Brings Joyous Memory

  • The correct order is been seen (pre-recent), done seen (recent), did see (pre-present), do see (past inceptive).

    I don’t care if you don’t like it, it’s a fact « Motivated Grammar

  • As we have seen, Heidegger thinks that the tradition takes its bearing from the end of the inceptive beginning.

    enowning

  • But Kant shows the limits of the mathematical prejudice and in doing so shows the limits of inceptive truth.

    enowning

  • We recall that in the 1935 lecture course, Heidegger specified two requirements for the overcoming of the disjunction. a The first was to show the limits of its inceptive truth.

    enowning

  • And this remark, be it observed, applies not merely to this first and inceptive attempt of mine, but to all that shall take the work in hand hereafter.

    The New Organon

  • Bradshaw's notes on all five cases had dealt mainly with inceptive, corroborative and indicative evidence, but had only lightly touched on the non-forensic aspects of direct and circumstantial evidence.

    The Fifth Rapunzel

  • Their inceptive Eden was soon invaded by a quarrelsome trio consisting of a licentious woman and two lovers whom she pitted, one against the other.

    Satan Comes to Eden

  • = 'If you had no intention of assisting me' -- the inceptive or conative imperfect (Woodcock 200).

    The Last Poems of Ovid

Comments

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  • "In mathematics, serving to initiate or produce: applied to such moments or first principles as, though of no magnitude themselves, are yet capable of producing results which are: thus, a point is inceptive of a line; a line, of a surface; and a surface, of a solid."
    --Cent. Dict.

    October 23, 2012