Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A thick porridge or pudding of cornmeal boiled in water or milk.
  • n. Something thick, soft, and pulpy.
  • n. Informal Mawkish sentimentality, affection, or amorousness.
  • transitive v. To reduce to mush; mash or crush.
  • intransitive v. To travel, especially over snow with a dogsled.
  • transitive v. To drive (a dogsled or team of dogs).
  • n. A journey, especially by dogsled.
  • interj. Used to command a team of dogs to begin pulling or move faster.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A mess, often of food; a soft or semisolid substance.
  • v. To squish so as to break into smaller pieces or to combine with something else.
  • n. magic mushrooms
  • n. A food comprising cracked or rolled grains cooked in water or milk; porridge.
  • n. cornmeal cooked in water and served as a porridge or as a thick sidedish like grits or mashed potatoes.
  • interj. A directive given (usually to dogs or a horse) to start moving, or to move faster.
  • n. A walk, especially across the snow with dogs.
  • v. To walk, especially across the snow with dogs.
  • v. To drive dogs, usually pulling a sled, across the snow.
  • n. A form of address to a man.
  • n. The face
  • v. To notch, cut, or indent (cloth, etc.) with a stamp.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Meal (esp. Indian meal) boiled in water; hasty pudding; supawn.
  • n. A march on foot, esp. across the snow with dogs; ; -- also used attributively.
  • intransitive v. To travel on foot, esp. across the snow with dogs.
  • transitive v. To notch, cut, or indent, as cloth, with a stamp.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To nick or notch (dress-fabrics) round the edges with a stamp, for ornament.
  • To reduce to a mush or a pulp, or to a pulverized condition; pulverize; crush.
  • To become reduced to a pulverized condition; crumble; waste away.
  • To trudge or travel through the snow, while driving a dog-sled. See mushing and musher.
  • n. Anything mashed.
  • n. Meal boiled in water or milk until it forms a thick, soft mass: as, oatmeal mush; mush and milk; specifically, such a preparation made from Indian corn; hasty-pudding.
  • n. Something resembling mush, as being soft and pulpy: as, mush of mud.
  • n. Fish ground up; chum; pomace; stosh.
  • n. Dust; dusty refuse.
  • n. The best kind of iron ore.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. travel with a dogsled
  • v. drive (a team of dogs or a dogsled)
  • n. a journey by dogsled
  • n. any soft or soggy mass
  • n. writing or music that is excessively sweet and sentimental
  • n. cornmeal boiled in water

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Probably alteration of mash.
Possibly alteration of French marchons, first person pl. imperative of marcher, to walk, go, from Old French; see march1.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Probably a variant of mash, or from a dialectal variant of Middle English mos ("mush, pulp, porridge"; compare Middle English appelmos ("applesauce")), from Old English mōs ("food, victuals, porridge, mush"), from Proto-Germanic *mōsan (“porridge, food”), from Proto-Indo-European *meh₂d- (“wet, fat, dripping”). Cognate with Scots moosh ("mush"), Dutch moes ("pulp, mush, porridge"), German Mus ("jam, puree, mush"), Swedish mos ("pulp, mash, mush"). See also moose.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Simple contraction of mushroom.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Old High German muos and Goidelic mus ("a pap") or muss ("a porridge"), or any thick preparation of fruit.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Believed to be a contraction of mush on, in turn a corruption of French marchons!, the cry of the voyageurs and coureurs de bois to their dogs.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Angloromani mush ("man"), from Romani murš, from Sanskrit  (manuSya, "human being, man").

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Compare French moucheter ("to cut with small cuts").

Examples

Comments

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  • Acronym - multi-user shared hallucination (roleplay gaming for multiple users).

    February 1, 2008