Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A fermentable starchy mixture from which alcohol or spirits can be distilled.
  • n. A mixture of ground grain and nutrients fed to livestock and fowl.
  • n. A soft pulpy mixture or mass.
  • n. Chiefly British Mashed potatoes.
  • n. A crushing or grinding.
  • n. Slang An infatuation or act of flirtation.
  • transitive v. To convert (malt or grain) into mash.
  • transitive v. To convert into a soft pulpy mixture: mash potatoes.
  • transitive v. To crush or grind. See Synonyms at crush.
  • transitive v. Chiefly Southern & South Midland U.S. To apply pressure to; press.
  • transitive v. Slang To flirt with or make sexual advances to.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A mesh
  • n. A mass of mixed ingredients reduced to a soft pulpy state by beating or pressure; a mass of anything in a soft pulpy state.
  • n. In brewing, ground or bruised malt, or meal of rye, wheat, corn, or other grain (or a mixture of malt and meal) steeped and stirred in hot water for making the wort.
  • n. Mashed potatoes.
  • n. A mixture of meal or bran and water fed to animals.
  • n. : A mess; trouble — Francis Beaumont & John Fletcher
  • v. To convert into a mash; to reduce to a soft pulpy state by beating or pressure; to bruise; to crush; as, to mash apples in a mill, or potatoes with a pestle. Specifically (Brewing), to convert, as malt, or malt and meal, into the mash which makes wort.
  • v. To press down hard (on).
  • v. to press.
  • v. To prepare a cup of tea (in a teapot), alternative to brew
  • v. to flirt, to make eyes, to make romantic advances
  • n. an infatuation, a crush, a fancy
  • n. a dandy, a masher
  • n. the object of one’s affections (either sex)

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. An abbreviation for Mobile Army Surgical Hospital, consisting of the equipment and personnel required to perform emergency operations on injured soldiers, located in tents near the front lines of combat.
  • n. A mesh.
  • n. A mass of mixed ingredients reduced to a soft pulpy state by beating or pressure; a mass of anything in a soft pulpy state. Specifically (Brewing), ground or bruised malt, or meal of rye, wheat, corn, or other grain (or a mixture of malt and meal) steeped and stirred in hot water for making the wort.
  • n. A mixture of meal or bran and water fed to animals.
  • n. A mess; trouble.
  • transitive v. To convert into a mash; to reduce to a soft pulpy state by beating or pressure; to bruise; to crush.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A mixture or mass of ingredients beaten or stirred together in a promiscuous manner; especially, a mess of bran and grain, or of meal, stirred with boiling water, or a mixture of boiled turnips and bran, etc., for feeding farm stock.
  • n. Softness produced by beating or bruising; a pulpy state or condition: in the phrase all to mash, or all to a mash.
  • n. In brewing and distilling, a mixture of ground grain, malted or otherwise prepared, and water.
  • n. A mess, mixture, or jumble; confusion; disorder; trouble.
  • n. A double-headed hammer for breaking coals.
  • n. [⟨ mash, transitive verb, 3.] One who gains the affection or sentimental admiration of another: as, he is evidently her mash.
  • To make a mash of by infusing or steeping in water, as malt in brewing.
  • To press or beat into a confused mass; crush by beating or pressure: as, to mash apples in a mill.
  • To gain the affection or sentimental admiration of (one of the opposite sex). See masher, 3.
  • Synonyms Crush, etc. See dash.
  • To act furiously; be violent: as, to go mashing around.
  • n. An obsolete form of mesh.
  • n. A dialectal form of marsh.
  • n. In India, a kind of bean, Phaseolus radiatus.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. talk or behave amorously, without serious intentions
  • n. a mixture of mashed malt grains and hot water; used in brewing
  • v. to compress with violence, out of natural shape or condition
  • v. reduce to small pieces or particles by pounding or abrading
  • n. mixture of ground animal feeds

Etymologies

Middle English mash- (as in mashfat, mash tub), from Old English *māsc, *mǣsc, māx- (in māxwyrt, wort). V., sense 5, perhaps from Romany mash, to entice.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
See mesh (Wiktionary)
From Middle English mash, mash-, from Old English mǣsc-, māsc-, māx-, from Proto-Germanic *maiskaz, *maiskō (“mixture, mash”), from Proto-Indo-European *meiǵ-, *meiḱ- (“to mix”). Akin to German Meisch, Maische ("mash"), (compare meischen, maischen ("to mash, wash")), Swedish mäsk ("mash"), and to Old English miscian ("to mix"). See mix. (Wiktionary)
Either[2] by analogy with[3] mash ("to press, to soften"), or more likely from Romani[4] masha ("a fascinator, an enticer"), mashdva ("fascination, enticement"). Originally used in theater,[5] and recorded in US in 1870s. Either originally used as mash, or a backformation from masher, from masha. Leland writes of the etymology:[6] (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • Mash potato, mash potato...

    August 2, 2009

  • Come along now – I just put the tea to mash.
    —Joan Aiken, 1980, The Shadow Guests

    OED sense 7. trans. Brit. regional. To infuse or brew (tea). Also intr.: (of tea) to draw, brew.

    August 7, 2008

  • Mobile Army Surgical Hospital

    June 22, 2008