Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Feed for livestock, especially coarsely chopped hay or straw.
  • n. Raw material, as for artistic creation.
  • n. A consumable, often inferior item or resource that is in demand and usually abundant supply: romantic novels intended as fodder for the pulp fiction market.
  • transitive v. To feed with fodder.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Food for animals.
  • n. A weight by which lead and some other metals were formerly sold, in England, varying from 19 1/2 to 24 cwt (993 to 1222 kg).; a fodder.
  • n. Tracing paper.
  • n. Something which serves as inspiration or encouragement, especially for satire or humour.
  • v. To feed animals (with fodder).

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A weight by which lead and some other metals were formerly sold, in England, varying from 191/2 to 24 cwt.; a fother.
  • n. That which is fed out to cattle horses, and sheep, as hay, cornstalks, vegetables, etc.
  • transitive v. To feed, as cattle, with dry food or cut grass, etc.; to furnish with hay, straw, oats, etc.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To feed with dry food or cut grass, etc.; supply with hay, straw, etc.: as, farmers fodder their cattle twice or thrice in a day.
  • To graze, as cattle.
  • n. Food for cattle, horses, and sheep, as hay, straw, and other kinds of vegetables. The word is usually confined to food that grows above ground and is fed in bulk.
  • n. Synonyms See feed, n.
  • n. A variant of fother.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. give fodder (to domesticated animals)
  • n. coarse food (especially for livestock) composed of entire plants or the leaves and stalks of a cereal crop
  • n. soldiers who are regarded as expendable in the face of artillery fire

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Middle English, from Old English fōdor; see pā- in Indo-European roots.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Old English fōdor, from Proto-Germanic *fōdran (compare Dutch voer 'pasture, fodder', German Futter 'feed', Swedish foder), from *fōda 'food', from Proto-Indo-European *pat- 'to feed'. More at food.

Examples

Comments

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  • What if when Luffy defeats Katakuri and comes out of the mirror, he sees Sanji standing over Oven and the rest of the army that he defeated, lighting his cigarette like a badass. Oven and everyone else there will be pretty much fodder for Sanji, Snack will be his true challenge.

    n. Raw material, as for artistic creation.

    https://readms.net/read/one_piece/894/end

    February 9, 2018