Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To fasten or catch temporarily with or as if with a loop, hook, or noose.
  • transitive v. To connect or attach, as to a vehicle: hitched the horses to the sleigh.
  • transitive v. To move or raise by pulling or jerking: hitch up one's suspenders.
  • transitive v. Informal To hitchhike: hitched a ride to the rally.
  • transitive v. Slang To marry: They got hitched last month.
  • intransitive v. To move haltingly; hobble.
  • intransitive v. To become entangled, snarled, or fastened.
  • intransitive v. Informal To hitchhike.
  • n. Any of various knots used as a temporary fastening.
  • n. A device used to connect one thing to another.
  • n. A short jerking motion; a tug.
  • n. A hobble or limp.
  • n. An impediment or a delay: a hitch in our plans.
  • n. A term of service, especially of military service.
  • n. Informal A free ride obtained along a road.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A sudden pull.
  • n. A fastener or connection point, as for a trailer.
  • n. A problem, delay or source of difficulty.
  • n. A hidden or unfavorable condition or element; a catch.
  • n. A period of time. Most often refers to time spent in the military.
  • v. To pull with a jerk.
  • v. To attach, tie or fasten.
  • v. To marry, especially to get hitched.
  • v. contraction of hitchhike, to thumb a ride.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A catch; anything that holds, as a hook; an impediment; an obstacle; an entanglement.
  • n. The act of catching, as on a hook, etc.
  • n. A stop or sudden halt; a stoppage; an impediment; a temporary obstruction; an obstacle
  • n. A sudden movement or pull; a pull up.
  • n. A knot or noose in a rope which can be readily undone; -- intended for a temporary fastening
  • n. A small dislocation of a bed or vein.
  • intransitive v. To hitchhike; -- mostly used in the phrase to hitch a ride.
  • transitive v. To become entangled or caught; to be linked or yoked; to unite; to cling.
  • transitive v. To move interruptedly or with halts, jerks, or steps; -- said of something obstructed or impeded.
  • transitive v. To hit the legs together in going, as horses; to interfere.
  • transitive v. To hook; to catch or fasten as by a hook or a knot; to make fast, unite, or yoke.
  • transitive v. To move with hitches.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To move by jerks or with pauses or rests; hop; hobble; halt; limp, literally or figuratively: as, to hitch along on the ground; verse that hitches.
  • To be fastened, entangled, or snarled; catch.
  • To strike the feet together in going; interfere, as a horse.
  • To get on with another, as if in harness; work smoothly together.
  • To pull up; raise by jerks.
  • To fasten, especially in a temporary or occasional way; make fast; tether; tie up by means of a hook, a ring, a bridle, a rope, etc.
  • Nautical, to cover with a network of twine or small cord, worked with one end.
  • To catch or dig into: said specifically of a tool that digs too deeply into a piece of work that is being cut.
  • In mining, to dig or pick (pockets) to receive the ends of timbers.
  • n. A pull or jerk upward: as, to give one's trousers a hitch.
  • n. The act of catching or fastening, as on a hook, a post, etc.
  • n. A halt; an impediment; a stoppage; an obstruction, especially of an unexpected and temporary nature: as, a hitch in the proceedings; a hitch in one's gait.
  • n. In mining, a slight fault or dislocation.
  • n. Temporary assistance; timely help: as, to lend one a hitch.
  • n. Nautical, a knot or noose in a rope for making it fast to another rope or to a spar or other object: as, a clove hitch, a rolling hitch, etc.
  • n. plural In whaling, the fastening of their on strap on the socket of a toggle-iron.
  • n. In mining:
  • n. A hole or pocket made to receive the end of a timber.
  • n. The sudden stoppage of a pumping-engine.
  • n. In yachting, a tack.
  • n. A large chub, Lavinia exilicauda, found in the waters of California. Also chi.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. travel by getting free rides from motorists
  • n. the uneven manner of walking that results from an injured leg
  • v. connect to a vehicle:
  • v. walk impeded by some physical limitation or injury
  • v. jump vertically, with legs stiff and back arched
  • n. a connection between a vehicle and the load that it pulls
  • v. to hook or entangle
  • n. a period of time spent in military service
  • n. an unforeseen obstacle
  • n. the state of inactivity following an interruption
  • n. a knot that can be undone by pulling against the strain that holds it; a temporary knot
  • n. any obstruction that impedes or is burdensome

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Probably from Middle English hytchen, icchen, to move, jerk.

Examples

Comments

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  • ... I learned to harness and hitch and work a team. Wendell Berry "A Native Hill"

    July 19, 2008