Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A tight curl, twist, or bend in a length of thin material, as one caused by the tensing of a looped section of wire.
  • n. A painful muscle spasm, as in the neck or back; a crick.
  • n. A difficulty or flaw that is likely to impede operation, as in a plan or system.
  • n. A mental peculiarity; a quirk.
  • n. An unusual or eccentric idea.
  • n. Slang Peculiarity or deviation in sexual behavior or taste.
  • transitive v. To form or cause to form a kink or kinks.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To laugh loudly.
  • v. To gasp for breath as in a severe fit of coughing.
  • n. A convulsive fit of coughing or laughter; a sonorous indraft of breath; a whoop; a gasp of breath caused by laughing, coughing, or crying.
  • n. A tight curl, twist, or bend in a length of thin material, hair etc.
  • n. A difficulty or flaw that is likely to impede operation, as in a plan or system.
  • n. Peculiarity or deviation in sexual behaviour or taste.
  • n. A fit of coughing or laughter.
  • n. A positive 1-soliton solution to the Sine–Gordon equation
  • v. To form a kink.
  • v. To be formed into a kink.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A twist or loop in a rope or thread, caused by a spontaneous doubling or winding upon itself; a close loop or curl; a doubling in a cord.
  • n. An unreasonable notion; a crotchet; a whim; a caprice.
  • intransitive v. To wind into a kink; to knot or twist spontaneously upon itself, as a rope or thread.
  • n. A fit of coughing; also, a convulsive fit of laughter.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A knot-like contraction or curl in a thread, cord, or rope, or in a hair, wire, or chain, resulting from its being twisted or doubled upon itself, or from the nature of the material. Also kinkle.
  • n. An unreasonable and obstinate notion; a crotchet; a whim.
  • To form kinks; twist or contract into knots.
  • To become entangled: said of a line.
  • To laugh loudly.
  • To gasp for breath as in a severe fit of coughing: especially applied to the noisy inspiration of breath in whooping-cough.
  • n. A convulsive fit of coughing or laughter; a sonorous indraft of the breath; the whoop in whooping-cough; a gasping for breath caused by coughing, laughing, or crying.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. form a curl, curve, or kink
  • n. a person with unusual sexual tastes
  • n. a difficulty or flaw in a plan or operation
  • n. a painful muscle spasm especially in the neck or back (`rick' and `wrick' are British)
  • n. a sharp bend in a line produced when a line having a loop is pulled tight
  • n. an eccentric idea
  • v. curl tightly

Etymologies

Dutch, twist in a rope.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English kinken, kynken, from Old English *cincian ("to laugh"; attested by cincung ("a fit of laughter")), from Proto-Germanic *kenk- (“to laugh”), from Proto-Indo-European *gang- (“to mock, jeer, deride”), related to Old English canc ("jeering, scorn, derision"). Cognate with Dutch kinken ("to kink, cough"). (Wiktionary)
From Norwegian or Swedish kink ("a twist or curl in a rope"), from Middle Low German kinke ("spiral screw, coil"), from Proto-Germanic *kenk-, *keng- (“to bend, turn”), from Proto-Indo-European *gengʰ- (“to turn, wind, braid, weave”). Cognate with Icelandic kengur ("a bend or bight; a metal crook"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

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  • I've heard that expression as well, but I think most Americans would say a crick is something that rises when it rains a lot. As in, "God willing and the crick don't rise." (An expression I find very cute.)

    Which makes me wonder, actually, if it's "and" or "an," in the Shakespearean sense--that is, "an" meaning "if." "God willing an the crick don't rise" means something a little different than "and the crick don't rise."

    I got rather off-track here, but anyway...

    November 29, 2007

  • This strikes me as another less-than-obvious definition, but then I'm a Brit. A Brit who speaks of having a crick in the neck.

    November 29, 2007