Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A long narrow trench or furrow dug in the ground, as for irrigation, drainage, or a boundary line.
  • transitive v. To dig or make a long narrow trench or furrow in.
  • transitive v. To surround with a long narrow trench or furrow.
  • transitive v. To drive (a vehicle) into a long narrow trench, as one beside a road.
  • transitive v. To derail (a train).
  • transitive v. Slang To get rid of; discard: ditched the old yard furniture.
  • transitive v. Slang To get away from (a person, especially a companion).
  • transitive v. Slang To discontinue use of or association with: ditch the job at the hamburger stand.
  • transitive v. Slang To skip (class or school).
  • transitive v. To crash-land (an aircraft) on water.
  • intransitive v. To dig a ditch.
  • intransitive v. To crash-land in water. Used of an aircraft or a pilot.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Alternative form of deech.
  • n. Alternative form of deech.
  • n. A trench; a long, shallow indentation, as for irrigation or drainage.
  • v. To discard or abandon.
  • v. To deliberately crash-land an airplane on the sea.
  • v. To deliberately not attend classes; to play hookey.
  • v. To dig ditches.
  • v. To dig ditches around.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A trench made in the earth by digging, particularly a trench for draining wet land, for guarding or fencing inclosures, or for preventing an approach to a town or fortress. In the latter sense, it is called also a moat or a fosse.
  • n. Any long, narrow receptacle for water on the surface of the earth.
  • transitive v. To dig a ditch or ditches in; to drain by a ditch or ditches.
  • transitive v. To surround with a ditch.
  • transitive v. To throw into a ditch.
  • intransitive v. To dig a ditch or ditches.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A trench made by digging; particularly, a trench for draining wet land, or for making a barrier to guard inclosures, or for preventing an enemy from approaching a town or a fortress.
  • n. Any narrow open passage for water on the surface of the ground.
  • To dig or make a ditch or ditches: as, ditching and delving; hedging and ditching.
  • To dig a ditch or ditches in; drain by a ditch: as, to ditch moist land.
  • To surround with a ditch.
  • To throw or run into or as if into a ditch: as, to ditch a railway-train.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. any small natural waterway
  • v. cut a trench in, as for drainage
  • v. forsake
  • v. sever all ties with, usually unceremoniously or irresponsibly
  • v. make an emergency landing on water
  • n. a long narrow excavation in the earth
  • v. crash or crash-land
  • v. throw away

Etymologies

Middle English dich, from Old English dīc; see dhīgw- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From earlier deche, from Middle English dechen, from Old English dēcan ("to smear, plaster, daub"). More at deech. (Wiktionary)
Middle English dich, from Old English dīċ ‘trench, moat’, from Proto-Germanic *dīkaz (cf. West Frisian dyk ‘dam’, Dutch dijk ‘id.’, German Teich ‘pond’), from Proto-Indo-European *dheigʷ ‘to stick, set up’ (cf. Latin fīgō ‘to affix, fasten’, Lithuanian diegti ‘to prick; plant’, dýgsti ‘to geminate, grow’). Doublet of dike. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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