Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A long narrow trench or furrow dug in the ground, as for irrigation, drainage, or a boundary line.
  • transitive v. To dig or make a long narrow trench or furrow in.
  • transitive v. To surround with a long narrow trench or furrow.
  • transitive v. To drive (a vehicle) into a long narrow trench, as one beside a road.
  • transitive v. To derail (a train).
  • transitive v. Slang To get rid of; discard: ditched the old yard furniture.
  • transitive v. Slang To get away from (a person, especially a companion).
  • transitive v. Slang To discontinue use of or association with: ditch the job at the hamburger stand.
  • transitive v. Slang To skip (class or school).
  • transitive v. To crash-land (an aircraft) on water.
  • intransitive v. To dig a ditch.
  • intransitive v. To crash-land in water. Used of an aircraft or a pilot.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Alternative form of deech.
  • n. Alternative form of deech.
  • n. A trench; a long, shallow indentation, as for irrigation or drainage.
  • v. To discard or abandon.
  • v. To deliberately crash-land an airplane on the sea.
  • v. To deliberately not attend classes; to play hookey.
  • v. To dig ditches.
  • v. To dig ditches around.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A trench made in the earth by digging, particularly a trench for draining wet land, for guarding or fencing inclosures, or for preventing an approach to a town or fortress. In the latter sense, it is called also a moat or a fosse.
  • n. Any long, narrow receptacle for water on the surface of the earth.
  • intransitive v. To dig a ditch or ditches.
  • transitive v. To dig a ditch or ditches in; to drain by a ditch or ditches.
  • transitive v. To surround with a ditch.
  • transitive v. To throw into a ditch.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To dig or make a ditch or ditches: as, ditching and delving; hedging and ditching.
  • To dig a ditch or ditches in; drain by a ditch: as, to ditch moist land.
  • To surround with a ditch.
  • To throw or run into or as if into a ditch: as, to ditch a railway-train.
  • n. A trench made by digging; particularly, a trench for draining wet land, or for making a barrier to guard inclosures, or for preventing an enemy from approaching a town or a fortress.
  • n. Any narrow open passage for water on the surface of the ground.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. any small natural waterway
  • v. cut a trench in, as for drainage
  • v. forsake
  • v. sever all ties with, usually unceremoniously or irresponsibly
  • v. make an emergency landing on water
  • n. a long narrow excavation in the earth
  • v. crash or crash-land
  • v. throw away

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Middle English dich, from Old English dīc; see dhīgw- in Indo-European roots.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From earlier deche, from Middle English dechen, from Old English dēcan ("to smear, plaster, daub"). More at deech.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Middle English dich, from Old English dīċ ‘trench, moat’, from Proto-Germanic *dīkaz (cf. West Frisian dyk ‘dam’, Dutch dijk ‘id.’, German Teich ‘pond’), from Proto-Indo-European *dheigʷ ‘to stick, set up’ (cf. Latin fīgō ‘to affix, fasten’, Lithuanian diegti ‘to prick; plant’, dýgsti ‘to geminate, grow’). Doublet of dike.

Examples

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