Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To escape or avoid by cleverness or deceit: evade arrest.
  • transitive v. To avoid fulfilling, answering, or performing: evade responsibility. See Synonyms at escape.
  • transitive v. To fail to make payment of (taxes).
  • transitive v. To avoid giving a direct answer to.
  • transitive v. To baffle or elude: The accident evades explanation.
  • intransitive v. To practice evasion.
  • intransitive v. To use cleverness or deceit in avoiding or escaping.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To get away from by artifice; to avoid by dexterity, subterfuge, address, or ingenuity; to elude; to escape from cleverly; as, to evade a blow, a pursuer, a punishment; to evade the force of an argument.
  • v. To escape; to slip away; — sometimes with from.
  • v. To attempt to escape; to practice artifice or sophistry, for the purpose of eluding.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To get away from by artifice; to avoid by dexterity, subterfuge, address, or ingenuity; to elude; to escape from cleverly.
  • transitive v. To escape; to slip away; -- sometimes with from.
  • transitive v. To attempt to escape; to practice artifice or sophistry, for the purpose of eluding.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To avoid by effort or contrivance; escape from or elude in any way, as by dexterity, artifice, stratagem, or address; slip away from; get out of the way of: as, to evade a blow; to evade pursuers.
  • To escape the reach or comprehension of; baffle or foil: as, a mystery that evades inquiry.
  • To escape; slip away: with from.
  • To practise evasion; use elusive methods.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. escape, either physically or mentally
  • v. practice evasion
  • v. use cunning or deceit to escape or avoid
  • v. avoid or try to avoid fulfilling, answering, or performing (duties, questions, or issues)

Etymologies

French évader, from Latin ēvādere : ē-, ex-, ex- + vādere, to go.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Latin ēvādō ("I pass or go over; flee"), from ē ("out of, from") + vādō ("I go; walk"): compare French évader. See wade. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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