Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A long, narrow, shallow trench made in the ground by a plow.
  • n. A rut, groove, or narrow depression: snow drifting in furrows.
  • n. A deep wrinkle in the skin, as on the forehead.
  • transitive v. To make long, narrow, shallow trenches in; plow.
  • transitive v. To form grooves or deep wrinkles in.
  • intransitive v. To become furrowed or wrinkled.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A trench cut in the soil, as when plowed in order to plant a crop.
  • n. A deep wrinkle in the skin of the face, especially on someone's forehead.
  • v. To make (a) groove, a cut(s) in (the ground etc.).
  • v. To wrinkle
  • v. To pull one's brows or eyebrows together due to worry, concentration etc.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A trench in the earth made by, or as by, a plow.
  • n. Any trench, channel, or groove, as in wood or metal; a wrinkle on the face.
  • transitive v. To cut a furrow in; to make furrows in; to plow.
  • transitive v. To mark with channels or with wrinkles.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A trench in the earth, especially that made by a plow.
  • n. A narrow trench or channel, as in wood or metal, or in a millstone; a groove; a wrinkle.
  • n. Specifically In zoology, a sulcus or wide groove, generally rounded at the bottom, and extending longitudinally on the animal or part; one of the spaces between costal or longitudinal ridges.
  • To cut a furrow in; make furrows in; plow.
  • To make narrow channels or grooves in; mark with or as with wrinkles.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a long shallow trench in the ground (especially one made by a plow)
  • v. cut a furrow into a columns
  • n. a slight depression in the smoothness of a surface
  • v. make wrinkled or creased
  • v. hollow out in the form of a furrow or groove

Etymologies

Middle English forwe, from Old English furh.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English furgh, forow, from Old English furh, from Proto-Germanic *furhō (cf. East Frisian fuurge, Dutch vore, German Furche, Swedish fåra), from Proto-Indo-European *pork̑os (cf. Welsh rhych ‘furrow’, Latin porca ‘lynchet’, Lithuanian prapar̃šas ‘ditch’, Sanskrit párśānas ‘chasm’). (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

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  • *added*
    Thanks.

    July 10, 2012

  • A Wordnet haiku:
    a long shallow trench
    cut a furrow into columns
    make wrinkled or creased

    July 10, 2012