Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A confused or disordered state or collection; a jumble: sorted through the clutter in the attic.
  • n. A confused noise; a clatter.
  • transitive v. To fill or spread over in a disorderly manner: Boxes cluttered the garage.
  • transitive v. To make disorderly or hard to use by filling or covering with objects: I cluttered up my desk with old memos.
  • intransitive v. To run or move with bustle and confusion.
  • intransitive v. To make a clatter.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. a confused disordered jumble of things
  • n. background echos, from clouds etc, on a radar screen
  • v. to fill something with clutter
  • v. To clot or coagulate, like blood.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A confused collection; hence, confusion; disorder.
  • n. Clatter; confused noise.
  • transitive v. To crowd together in disorder; to fill or cover with things in disorder; to throw into disorder; to disarrange.
  • intransitive v. To make a confused noise; to bustle.
  • transitive v. To clot or coagulate, as blood.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To clot; coagulate.
  • To become clotted or coagulated.
  • n. A heap or collection of things lying in confusion; confusion; litter; disorder.
  • To crowd together in disorder; fill with things in confusion: often with up: as, to clutter the things all together; to clutter up the house.
  • To make a bustle or disturbance.
  • n. Confused noise; bustle; clatter; turmoil.
  • To jumble words together in speaking, clipping syllables and dropping consonants.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. unwanted echoes that interfere with the observation of signals on a radar screen
  • v. fill a space in a disorderly way
  • n. a confused multitude of things

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Probably from Middle English cloteren, to clot, from clot, lump, from Old English clott.

Examples

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