Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To put or attach before or in front of.
  • transitive v. To settle or arrange in advance.
  • transitive v. Grammar To add as a prefix.
  • transitive v. Grammar To add a prefix to.
  • n. Grammar An affix, such as dis- in disbelieve, attached to the front of a word to produce a derivative word or an inflected form.
  • n. A title placed before a person's name.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. That which is prefixed; especially one or more letters or syllables added to the beginning of a word to modify its meaning; as, pre- in prefix, con- in conjure.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To put or fix before, or at the beginning of, another thing.
  • transitive v. To set or appoint beforehand; to settle or establish antecedently.
  • n. That which is prefixed; esp., one or more letters or syllables combined or united with the beginning of a word to modify its signification.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To fix or put before; place in front; put at the beginning.
  • To fix beforehand; set or appoint in advance; settle beforehand.
  • n. A word or syllable, or a number of syllables, rarely more than two, and usually one (sometimes reduced to a single consonant not forming a syllable), affixed to the beginning of a word, to qualify its meaning or direct, its application: opposed to suffix or postfix, a like addition at the end of a word.
  • n. The act of prefixing; prefixion.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. attach a prefix to
  • n. an affix that is added in front of the word

Etymologies

Middle English prefixen, from Old French prefixer : pre-, before (from Latin prae-; see pre-) + fixer, to place (from Latin fīxus, past participle of fīgere, to fasten; see dhīgw- in Indo-European roots). N., from New Latin praefīxum, from neuter sing. of Latin praefīxus, past participle of praefīgere, to fix in front : prae-, pre- + fīgere, to fasten.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle French prefixer (verb) and Late Latin praefixum (noun), both from Latin praefixus, past participle of praefīgō ("I (fix, fasten, set up) in front”, “I fix on the (end, extremity)") (from prae- ("before") + fīgō ("I fix”, “I fasten”, “I affix")). (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.