Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To transmit (money) in payment.
  • transitive v. To refrain from exacting (a tax or penalty, for example); cancel.
  • transitive v. To pardon; forgive: remitted their sins.
  • transitive v. To restore to a former condition or position.
  • transitive v. Law To refer (a case) to another court for further consideration or action.
  • transitive v. Law To refer (a matter) to a committee or authority for decision.
  • transitive v. To allow to slacken: The storm remitted its fury.
  • transitive v. To desist from; give up.
  • transitive v. To put off; postpone.
  • intransitive v. To transmit money.
  • intransitive v. To diminish; abate.
  • n. The act of remitting, especially the referral of a case to another court.
  • n. A matter remitted for further consideration.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To forgive, pardon.
  • v. To give up, stop succumbing to (a negative emotion etc.).
  • v. To allow (something) to slacken, to relax (one's attention etc.).
  • v. To show a lessening or abatement (of) a specified quality.
  • v. To diminish, abate.
  • v. To refer (something) for deliberation, judgment, etc. (to a particular body or person).
  • v. To postpone.
  • v. To transmit or send, as money in payment.
  • n. terms of reference; set of responsibilities.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To send back; to give up; to surrender; to resign.
  • transitive v. To restore.
  • transitive v. To transmit or send, esp. to a distance, as money in payment of a demand, account, draft, etc..
  • transitive v. To send off or away; hence: (a) To refer or direct (one) for information, guidance, help, etc. “Remitting them … to the works of Galen.” Sir T. Elyot. (b) To submit, refer, or leave (something) for judgment or decision.
  • transitive v. To relax in intensity; to make less violent; to abate.
  • transitive v. To forgive; to pardon; to remove.
  • transitive v. To refrain from exacting or enforcing.
  • intransitive v. To abate in force or in violence; to grow less intense; to become moderated; to abate; to relax
  • intransitive v. To send money, as in payment.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To send back.
  • To transmit or send, as money, bills, or other things in payment for goods received.
  • To restore; replace.
  • To transfer.
  • In law, to transfer (a cause) from one tribunal or judge to another, particularly from an appellate court to the court of original jurisdiction. See remit, n.
  • To refer.
  • To give or deliver up; surrender; resign.
  • To slacken; relax the tension of; hence, figuratively, to diminish in intensity; make less intense or violent; abate.
  • To refrain from exacting; give up, in whole or in part: as, to remit punishment.
  • To pardon; forgive.
  • To omit; cease doing.
  • Synonyms To forward.
  • To release, relinquish.
  • To slacken; become less intense or rigorous.
  • To abate by growing less earnest, eager, or active.
  • In medicine, to abate in violence for a time without intermission: as, a fever remits at a certain hour every day.
  • In com., to transmit money, etc.
  • n. In Scots law, a remission; a sending back.
  • n. A formal communication from a body having higher jurisdiction, to one subordinate to it.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. refer (a matter or legal case) to another committee or authority or court for decision
  • n. (law) the act of remitting (especially the referral of a law case to another court)
  • v. release from (claims, debts, or taxes)
  • v. make slack as by lessening tension or firmness
  • v. hold back to a later time
  • v. send (money) in payment
  • v. forgive
  • v. diminish or abate
  • n. the topic that a person, committee, or piece of research is expected to deal with or has authority to deal with

Etymologies

Middle English remitten, to send back, from Latin remittere : re-, re- + mittere, to send.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Latin remittere ("to send, send back"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

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